Talk:Tarbell Cassette Interface

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Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the proposal was Moved to Tarbell (data storage) by User:Ettrig. --rgpk (comment) 17:33, 8 February 2011 (UTC)

TarbelTarbell Cassette Interface — Here's a link to the manual for this item, which is spelled double-L.

http://www.hartetechnologies.com/manuals/Tarbell/Tarbell%20Cassette%20Interface.pdf— Preceding unsigned comment added by 109.156.251.43 (talkcontribs) 14:17, 8 February 2011

The above discussion is preserved as an archive of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

Tarbell standard used on flexi discs?[edit]

This external link was deleted from the article, and while it seems to be someone's blog and thus perhaps not a WP:Reliable source, I thought it was interesting enough to put here.

Seems the Tarbell standard was used to record music on flexi discs. With good sourcing, perhaps this can be added to the article. Kansas City standard already discusses flexi discs. --Wbm1058 (talk) 18:57, 28 March 2012 (UTC)

On second read, it appears that "easter eggs" were left on some plain ol' LP records. Anyhow, here's what the creator of this article had to say (unreferenced):

The TARBEL system was an early computer standard for saving and reading computer information using audio cassette (or any other audio) tape. There were several computer systems that used the cassette interface, most with their own data encoding system. TARBEL was used by the Sinclair computer.
Although outdated, there are apparently software emulators that can allow you the interpret and run TARBEL software. Some artists (Information Society, in particular) included a long (3-minute or so) song at the end of their cassette tape and quite a few people returned their copy for a "non-encoded" version so they didn't have to listen to how many minutes of (basically) FAX sounds.

Wbm1058 (talk) 19:27, 28 March 2012 (UTC)

Year Correction[edit]

Tarbell was making these cassette tape interfaces in 1976. I spent my free hours as a high school senior assembling kits in to finished controllers in my fathers shop. My father fine tuned the clock hardware on a breadboard before butting the parts in bags. They may have been produced as early as mid to late 1975 but I wasn't paying that much attention, I was happy to be making $25 a kit to build them and that was good money to a high school kid.— Preceding unsigned comment added by 2602:306:bc4c:eff0:d984:761c:74c0:31f (talkcontribs) 07:47, 5 November 2013

Thanks for your contribution. I've copied it to the appropriate venue for personal recollections, the talk page for the article, and will correct the article based on reliable sources. – Wbm1058 (talk) 17:07, 8 November 2013 (UTC)