Talk:Tattoo

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Proposed addition[edit]

A new editor added this long discussion to the Temporary tattoo section. It reads a bit like an advert, but perhaps there is some material worth keeping in there. I took it out of article, but put it here for editors to pick over:


Fake and Temporary Tattoos

This day and age, more and more people are deciding to get permanent tattoos, leaving their mark of choice on their skin. If the tattoo is applied by an experienced artist, the risk involved will be minimal. As sad as it is however, many people who get tattoos end up going to studios that use unsanitary equipment - resulting in infections or other serious problems.

Years ago, temporary tattoos were found in quarter machines, bubble gum wrappers, and even toy sections of the local store. Children loved to get these temporary tattoos, as they presented a way for children to have a tattoo - one that was completely safe and would wash off. Now days, even adults are beginning to think that this is the right idea. The temporary tattoos of today are no longer just for children, as most last a long time - making them perfect for adults.

The best thing about temporary tattoos, is the fact that they are indeed temporary. With temporary tattoos, you don’t have to worry about infections or unsanitary equipment, as there is no piercing of the skin involved. Temporary tattoos are safe, and remove easily with soap and water. This is very cost friendly as well - as permanent tattoos require surgery to remove.

If you have been thinking about getting a permanent tattoo, you should first give a temporary tattoo a try. Tattoos that are temporary provide an excellent way to test out designs, and see if a tattoo is right for you. If you don’t like it, all you have to do is wash it off. Then, you can purchase another one and see if you like it better. There are literally thousands of temporary tattoos out there, with designs that are sure to please everyone.

If you decide to get a permanent tattoo instead, you are pretty much stuck with it. To get rid of a permanent tattoo, you’ll need to have it surgically removed, which can cost you thousands of dollars. You’ll also face the risk of infection, along with a permanent scar. Permanent tattoos are great though - providing you are happy with the tattoo.

In most cases, temporary tattoos look just like a permanent tattoo. To use them, simply lick the tattoo or use water and apply to your skin. When you have it where you want it, simply apply pressure for a few seconds. They are easy to apply, and last until you wash them off. If you decide to get a longer lasting temporary tattoo, it will last for a longer period of time. This way, you can decide if a permanent tattoo is going to be worth the investment.

You can find temporary tattoos in local stores or on the Internet. They are very affordable as well, even cheaper if you buy them in bulk. Tattoo artists also sell them, and normally have a large selection on hand. This way, you can look through the available selections and find the tattoo that best fits your style.

All in all, temporary tattoos are easier to apply than permanent tattoos and they pose no risk to your skin or your health. Those that are afraid of needles tend to like them as well, as they give you the chance to have a tattoo without going under the needle. Before you rush out and get a tattoo, you should instead give temporary tattoos a try. They won’t cost you a lot of money - yet they will give you the chance to see how you look with a tattoo - and decide if a permanent tattoo is really something you want.

One of the most popular Temporary Tattoo is the Tattoo Sleeve They are similar to a ladies stocking and are easier to apply then stick on tattoos.

Reliable sources[edit]

There seems to be some confusion about it. There are currently cites claiming to support that Britain is named after "design" (which would be news to Britain (name) and wikt:Britain) and that being tattooed was a royal privilege in modern Europe (which is somewhere in between overstating the case and complete fabrication). Could someone with access to these (unlinked) sources clean up what the authors were actually claiming or remove them per WP:UNDUE? — LlywelynII 07:28, 18 August 2013 (UTC)

Misordered text[edit]

The line "Native Americans also used tattoos to represent their tribe." in the following excerpt should be moved sooner or later in the article (unless the native american practice is somehow associated with criminality.

The Romans tattooed criminals and slaves, and in the 19th century released US convicts and British army deserters were identified by tattoos. Prisoners in Siberian and Nazi concentration camps were tattooed with an identification number. Today, many prison inmates still tattoo themselves as an indication of time spent in prison.[3]
Native Americans also used tattoos to represent their tribe.
Insofar as this cultural or subcultural use of tattoos predates the widespread popularity of tattoos in the general population, tattoos are still associated with criminality. Tattoos on the face in the shape of teardrops are usually associated with how many people a person has murdered. Although the general acceptance of tattoos is on the rise in Western society, they still carry a heavy stigma among certain social groups. Tattoos are generally considered an important part of the culture of the Russian mafia.

I don't see a good place or I would have just done it. Cheers, Randy Sage, 67.174.221.32 (talk) 15:04, 22 September 2013 (UTC) (not signed in)

Tattoos have been around for hundreds of years and have served throughout time as permanent pieces that are memoirs to our loved ones, faith or religion, significant things to us, or in basic cases forms of art expression. The negative stigma associated with tattooed individuals needs to end; it is unfair to discriminate against possible employers because tattooed people were once known to be druggies or thugs. Tattoos are more common now than ever; one in ten people are now tattooed and it is no longer strange to see that someone has and displays their body ink. As we continue to modernize, so does our acceptance of different styles, appearances, and learn to respect other’s ways of life. In the workforce, it is vital for discrimination against tattooed individuals to end. It is not the appearance of someone that should matter, but their resume, skill set, and unique talents. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 97.121.162.19 (talk) 07:59, 12 December 2013 (UTC)

Tatau?[edit]

Why is tattoo called tatau in Far Cry 3?--78.156.109.166 (talk) 19:06, 31 January 2014 (UTC)

Social Stigma & Form of Self-Mutilation[edit]

Where's the section describing the intensely socially stigmatizing effects of tattoos? Or of their historical association with criminality and mental instability, being a widely recognized form of self-mutilation, strongly indicative of mental illness in the wearer? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 49.181.226.11 (talk) 21:08, 29 July 2014 (UTC)