Talk:Term limits in the United States

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Hello, I ask for pros and cons to term limits for senators and representaives, or just plain Congressmen! The answers you give me are essential, so answer honestly and ASAP!!!!! Signed: BlueCaper (talk) 20:28, 4 March 2008 (UTC)

I've copied your question to Wikipedia:Reference_desk/Humanities#Term_limits (in a week it will be archived to Wikipedia:Reference_desk/Archives/Humanities/2008_March_4#Term_limits) —Random832 20:34, 4 March 2008 (UTC)

Thank you very much, Random 832! I am starting to find answers off of Useless-knowledge.com, but they worded it so abstrusely and technically that I cannot understand any of it. So I think you really helped me on this one. I appreciate it much! BlueCaper (talk) 21:01, 4 March 2008 (UTC)

What? "In June 1776, the Continental Congress"[edit]

This needs to be clarified:

In June 1776, the Continental Congress appointed a committee of thirteen to examine forms of government for the impending union of the states. Among the proposals was that from the State of Virginia, written by Thomas Jefferson, urging a limitation of tenure, "to prevent every danger which might arise to American freedom by continuing too long in office the members of the Continental Congress...."[1] The committee made recommendations, which as regards congressional term-limits were incorporated unchanged into the Articles of Confederation (1781-1789]). The fifth Article stated that "no person shall be capable of being a delegate [to the continental congress] for more than three years in any term of six years."[2]

If it's June 1776 you're talking about the Second Continental Congress, but the topic sounds like something that was discussed at the First Continental Congress. In any case the paragraph is ambiguous. I think the fear @ the time was that holders of office might resemble a King. --TMH (talk) 08:28, 31 October 2008 (UTC)

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Good Behaviour (with a u)[edit]

If we're going to cite and quote the United States Constitution, then we need to cite and quote what it actually says. It says "Behaviour" (capital "B" and with a "u"). Please don't change the spelling unless you're going to eliminate the quotation or find a different source for the text of the Constitution that agrees with your spelling. Thanks! 67.239.64.253 (talk) 17:17, 1 September 2012 (UTC)

Proposed term limits[edit]

I removed the section on proposed term limits - there are going to be a lot of proposals, and the section is fairly clearly not being maintained (missing several recent attempts on introducing term limits), so I just don't see its usefulness. If there's one or two particularly notable efforts (that had an effect on more than one state), perhaps they'd be worthy of note, but not a general section. --Philosopher Let us reason together. 15:14, 23 October 2012 (UTC)

What about gubernatorial succession[edit]

The article does not provide some information upon gubernatorial succession and term limits. At the federal level, a vice president who succeeds the presidency could be elected twice and serve a total of ten years if less than two years remain of the term he has to complete. Is there the same rule in the states, especially in those states with two terms as total limit (like California). Could Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom (CA) be elected in 2014 and 2018 would he succeed the governorship next week (when more than two years of Jerry Brown’s term passed)? --91.103.112.54 (talk) 09:20, 2 January 2013 (UTC)

Term Limits in the Constitution[edit]

largely because of grassroots support for the principle of rotation, rapid turnover in Congress prevailed Sounds good but how do we know this? Perhaps a citation is needed. Josephdurnal (talk) 14:02, 14 July 2013 (UTC)

Year typo?[edit]

"On October 2, 1789, the Continental Congress appointed a committee of thirteen to examine forms of government for the impending union of the states. Among the proposals was that from the State of Virginia, written by Thomas Jefferson, urging a limitation of tenure, "to prevent every danger which might arise to American freedom by continuing too long in office the members of the Continental Congress".[4] The committee made recommendations, which as regards congressional term limits were incorporated unchanged into the Articles of Confederation (1781–89)."

The way I read this, the committee was making suggestions about the (then new) Articles of Confederation. If this is the case, then it does not make sense for it to have taken place in 1789 (when the Articles had since been replaced by the Constitution. Either the date is wrong, or the committee was not writing about the Articles of Confederation. Does anyone know which it is, and (if it is the former) what the correct date would be? Nathaniel Greene (talk) 23:10, 29 November 2013 (UTC)

Good question. Good you pointed this out. I'll try to look into this when I have time but I bet there are more knowledgeable folks who could weigh in here?--Tomwsulcer (talk) 00:49, 1 December 2013 (UTC)