Talk:Texas Instruments

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Citation for Semiconductor Ranking[edit]

Looks like TI is using Gartner as the source for it's No. 3 in the world claim. Worldwide_Top_20_Semiconductor_Sales_Leaders links to this CMP Media Graphic as it's source. --David 17:24, 30 October 2007 (UTC)

Looks like TI is now number 2! http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-12969523

Major updates[edit]

I've updated the "TI Today" section to be more complete and up to date. I'm planning to add quite a bit to the TI history section with info about TI's old defense, PC and laptop, and software businesses. --Chris 02:58, Jun 15, 2005 (UTC)

Article needs info on TI's Materials Division, which made clad metal for coins and other uses. 69.91.82.28 13:55, 10 August 2007 (UTC)

I've been updating the history section and plan to do more as time permits. I started adding references to companies that began as spinoffs from form TI. For example Compaq, Mostek, etc. I know that there are many others and would appreciate other contributions on this. Starrymessenger (talk) 15:23, 18 August 2008 (UTC)

Contamination section[edit]

This text is basically cut and pasted from another web site. I don't think it meets the NPOV test, so I'm removing it. I will leave in the reference link to the other web site. - jr 04:27, July 11, 2005 (UTC)


Linking TI pages together[edit]

Really need to link the different TI and TI product pages together and start getting some information added on the different dsp families Alxx

[edit]

I believe the logo should be reverted back to the white on black background version. I will need to check the corporate style guide to confirm, but I believe the white-on-black is the "official" logo of TI, while the black-on-white is an acceptable alternate. TI's corporate web site (www.ti.com) uses the white-on-black logo exclusively. Chfowler 01:08, 30 January 2006 (UTC)

  • I checked the style guide - the black on white is OK, but the official logo is the format of "Texas" over "Instruments", like the previous logo. I'm changing the logo to the official one. Chfowler 05:39, 2 February 2006 (UTC)

Minicomputers[edit]

Although they didn't have much market share, TI made minicomputers during the '70s. It isn't mentioned in this article (except as a See also), but the Wikipedia does have an article on the TI-990. BlankVerse 22:45, 14 December 2006 (UTC)

Wristwatches[edit]

It should be noted in the article that TI also manufactured wristwatches at one time. I'm holding an old TI watch right now. 156.34.233.39 (talk) 14:44, 27 April 2008 (UTC)

Dubious[edit]

The blurb about the TI Professional Computer, midway through the article, says it "introduced the VGA" in 1983. This can't be right, because IBM introduced VGA with the PS/2 in 1987; however, I did get to see a TIPC many years ago (around 1987, actually), and the screen seemed relatively sharp, like the double-scan CGA Compaq and Olivetti/AT&T used. Does anyone know for sure what the TIPC's specs were? -lee (talk) 16:15, 6 June 2008 (UTC)

I owned , in 1986 a 1983 TIPC fitted with (and I quote) with a 'Video Graphics Array' posessing all the characteristics of the EGA, but with a full 8 colours. Further, the performance was that of a very fast 386 despite being a 8086 CPU machine - probably as it was optimised. Full Res on the VGA was the same as the later commercial VGA, from which the TI was derived. An interesting point was that the grpahic output was a pin-compatible with the HGA/CGA, as well as an RCA ! The machine I had used an RCA signal plug from card to screen. This produced a fantastic refresh rate, and rock-steady image. Another interesting point was that colours were available on lines, points, blocks etc etc.....My machine ran MS-DOS 2.11, MS-Basic, Easywriter, and Multiplan with a 10Mb Winchester Drive. -Deepshark5 (talk) 8:15, 11 July 2008

Interesting. It sounds like one of the "super CGA" cards that were popular in the mid-1980s, before Paradise and the C&T EGA chipset made EGA clones affordable. Compaq and AT&T/Olivetti used something similar, running at 640x400 for text mode and switching to a 200-line mode for graphics. -lee (talk) 14:55, 11 August 2008 (UTC)


I found this paragraph in the history section: "An early success story for TI-GSI came in the 1800's afters when GSI was able (under a Top Secret government contract) to monitor the Soviet Union's underground nuclear weapons testing from outcrop bedrock found in Oklahoma.[citation needed]". Although the idea that the US was monitoring Soviet nukes during the 1800's would make for a great book, I've reverted it to its previous version which had the date as the 1950's.JB Gnome (talk) 19:51, 5 July 2013 (UTC)

TMS 1000[edit]

Translation request: Can someone translate this article: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/TMS1000 (German); Alecv (talk) 17:52, 19 September 2008 (UTC)


Manufacturing[edit]

The page has very little information on their manufacturing facilities, both historical and current. If anyone has information on where their fabrication plants are located (and former ones), I'd like to see it go in a separate section. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 219.89.245.169 (talk) 10:16, 23 September 2010 (UTC)

NPOV issues[edit]

Much of the article is not written in a neutral point of view. There are quite a few weasel words. For example "the 68000 is far more powerful, and therefore better suited for gaming and processor intensive applications." according to whom? Some work needs to be done to fix this. --Alpha Quadrant talk 19:56, 9 December 2010 (UTC)

Cutting, rewording, rearranging[edit]

So yeah, I'm half-taking responsibility for shaping up this article, I guess. I'm working largely off the assumption that the article, while somewhat advertisement-y and self-inflated, is still, at its heart, factual, though, so if there's something wrong, it's going to stay wrong. It'll just be reworded in a less "we're TI look how awesome we are!" kind of way. I've already done a lot to it, so if someone could come in and make sure I haven't done anything super stupid, that'd be great. Reil (talk) 23:57, 16 July 2011 (UTC)

Thanks for working on this article. However, because this article has multiple issues, I am reassessing to class=start. Specific issues noted are:
  • Its quality may be compromised by peacock terms. Tagged since May 2011.
  • Its neutrality is disputed. Tagged since December 2010.
  • It is written like an advertisement and needs to be rewritten from a neutral point of view. Tagged since May 2011. ---- Steve Quinn (talk) 02:37, 23 July 2011 (UTC)
If no one objects in a week or so, I'll go ahead and remove the above tags. The article still needs a lot of work, but I don't think there's much advertisement-y stuff left in the article now. Reil (talk) 03:43, 24 February 2012 (UTC)
The deed is done. Reil (talk) 00:03, 3 March 2012 (UTC)

Lead[edit]

I recommend the {{lead too short}} be removed. Anyone have suggestions for what should be additionally included in the lead? It is a nice concise lead. --Pmsyyz (talk) 12:03, 18 March 2012 (UTC)

The lead was lacking many details, such as being credited as the inventors of a number of devices which were and are still widely used, the various products the company produced over time and a couple of other notable facts. Notice it is now three or four paragraphs and not three or four sentences and that nearly all section headings have a corresponding summary sentence. - Shiftchange (talk) 14:43, 18 March 2012 (UTC)

5400 series was mil spec[edit]

The 5400 logic series was the military spec equivalent of the 7400 series. This was common knowledge among digital designers in the 1970's and 1980's. Constant314 (talk) 22:21, 23 April 2012 (UTC)

Pls give a reference for the common knowledge. Polmandc (talk) 04:50, 24 April 2012 (UTC)
Please refer to this link http://faculty.weber.edu/fonbrown/EE1000/Chapter%206.pdf

"The industry standard for logic device nomenclature today is the 5400/7400 series (originally developed by Texas Instruments); it is by far the most common and encompasses a great many logic families. The difference between the 5400 and the 7400 series is that the 5400 series devices operate over the military temperature range of -55°C to 125°C, and the less expensive 7400 series devices need only operate over the commercial temperature range of 0°C to 70°C."

This is only "common knowledge" among experienced and aged engineers, and this is rarely documented since military documentations generally will not be released to public. All the mil-spec that leaked out in the market is actually illegal stuffs except there are very common.

To make the discussion more complete, temperature range for IC can be divided into following categories: Commerical: 0-70C Industrial: -40-85C Automotive Grade: -40-125C (there are sub-grades but I think it is not important to mention) Military Grade: -55-125C

You can see there is a gradual trend of increase in temperature range. Rimsky.cheng (talk) 02:01, 3 October 2014 (UTC)