Talk:Thanksgiving

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Thanksgiving info[edit]

Sadly you left out that the Jews have been doing this from the beginning of the Bible as the formal rolling out of this thanksgiving was in the Feasts of the Lord given to the Jewish nation as they left Egypt and it was formally given to the nation at Mt Sinai. The Pilgrims, who were probably anti-Jewish in general <COMMENT: this is a incorrect and personal opinion statement. The Pilgrims were Christians who following the God of the Torah, and there is no historical evidence of this claim.> were practicing the Feast by doing what they did for correct reasons but of course did not attribute it to those same feasts the Jews were already doing as commanded by God. The Pilgrims thus, as presented, "originated" the so called Thanks giving feast somewhat modeled after what they did know of the Jews feasts. Note also that in the Bible they are not the Feasts of the Jews but the Feasts of the Lord thus expected to be done by all as God is out creator-thanks for what info you did have! Source: Hebraic studies of the Bible in the original language.

American Thanksgiving Info.[edit]

The Pilgrims set ground at Plymouth Rock on December 11, 1620. Their first winter was devastating and by the fall they had lost 46 of the original 102 who sailed on the Mayflower. However, the harvest of 1621 was a bountiful one and the remaining colonists decided to celebrate with a feast, so they invited the Native American Indians who had helped them survive their first year. The feast lasted three days and included wild ducks, geese, venison, fish, boiled pumpkin, berries and dried fruits. It is not certain that wild turkey was a part of their feast since the pilgrims used the word "turkey" to mean any sort of wild fowl.

However, this first Thanksgiving feast was not repeated the following year. In fact, it wasn’t until June of 1676 that the governing council of Charlestown, Massachusetts proclaimed another Day of Thanksgiving to express thanks for the good fortune that had seen their community securely established.

However, much like the original Thanksgiving in 1620, this day was also not repeated the following year. October 1777 marked the first time that all 13 colonies joined in a Thanksgiving celebration but again, this was a one-time affair.

In fact, until 1863 Thanksgiving Day had not been celebrated annually since the first feast in 1621. It was Sarah Josepha Hale, a magazine editor, whose efforts eventually led to what we recognize today as Thanksgiving. She encouraged President Abraham Lincoln to establish the last Thursday in November as a day for national thanksgiving and prayer, hence, Thanksgiving Day.

Cite error: There are <ref> tags on this page without content in them (see the help page). The following information can be found at: http://www.abrahamlincolnonline.org/lincoln/speeches/thanks.htm

Proclamation of Thanksgiving Washington, D.C. October 3, 1863

This is the proclamation which set the precedent for America's national day of Thanksgiving. During his administration, President Lincoln issued many orders similar to this. For example, on November 28, 1861, he ordered government departments closed for a local day of thanksgiving.

Sarah Josepha Hale, a 74-year-old magazine editor, wrote a letter to Lincoln on September 28, 1863, urging him to have the "day of our annual Thanksgiving made a National and fixed Union Festival." She explained, "You may have observed that, for some years past, there has been an increasing interest felt in our land to have the Thanksgiving held on the same day, in all the States; it now needs National recognition and authoritive fixation, only, to become permanently, an American custom and institution."

Prior to this, each state scheduled its own Thanksgiving holiday at different times, mainly in New England and other Northern states. President Lincoln responded to Mrs. Hale's request immediately, unlike several of his predecessors, who ignored her petitions altogether. In her letter to Lincoln she mentioned that she had been advocating a national thanksgiving date for 15 years as the editor of Godey's Lady's Book. George Washington was the first president to proclaim a day of thanksgiving, issuing his request on October 3, 1789, exactly 74 years before Lincoln's.

The document below sets apart the last Thursday of November "as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise." According to an April 1, 1864, letter from John Nicolay, one of President Lincoln's secretaries, this document was written by Secretary of State William Seward, and the original was in his handwriting. On October 3, 1863, fellow Cabinet member Gideon Welles recorded in his diary how he complimented Seward on his work. A year later the manuscript was sold to benefit Union troops.

By the President of the United States of America.

A Proclamation.

The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign States to invite and to provoke their aggression, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere except in the theatre of military conflict; while that theatre has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union. Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful industry to the national defence, have not arrested the plough, the shuttle or the ship; the axe has enlarged the borders of our settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege and the battle-field; and the country, rejoicing in the consiousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years with large increase of freedom. No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American People. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquillity and Union.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington, this Third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the Unites States the Eighty-eighth.

By the President: Abraham Lincoln

William H. Seward, Secretary of State — Preceding unsigned comment added by Lloyd Hayes (talkcontribs) 13:28, 28 November 2013 (UTC)

Material as detailed and extensive as this might be better considered for Thanksgiving (United States), rather than here. Please don't copy your first four paragraphs there, though, as they seem to be a copy of this page, which appears to be copyrighted. --Stfg (talk) 13:46, 28 November 2013 (UTC)
  • This suggests that national Thanksgivings in the fall were celebrated throughout the Revolutionary war period. [1] and individual states had set it up before Lincoln's proclamation. Alanscottwalker (talk) 13:55, 28 November 2013 (UTC)

Deliverance of Queen Anne[edit]

Days of Thanksgiving were called (...) following the deliverance of Queen Anne in 1705

Either the year is wrong, or I have no idea what's meant by deliverance. Because when I look at the Queen Anne article, the last pregnancy was in 1700. The only one worth celebrating IMHO would be the deliverance of Prince William, Duke of Gloucester in 1689. By 1705, he unfortunately wasn't even alive anymore. Digital Brains (talk) 20:23, 28 November 2013 (UTC)

Controversy section for United States Thanksgiving[edit]

I would like to see the addition of a section for the United States Thanksgiving based on the controversy surrounding Native American beliefs about misrepresented history, massacres and Thanksgiving. Possible places to start for research might be: [1] [2] [3] [4]

Or, if a section of its own isn't approved, links to this site's own articles outlining the National Day of Mourning begun by Native Americans in New England in 1970 and Unthanksgiving Day established in 1975 seems fitting. [5] [6]

The idea isn't to create controversy, of course, only to educate people that such a controversy even exists when they research Thanksgiving Day.

Mkindle (talk) 20:33, 28 November 2013 (UTC)

It might be a bit late for this year, but you've got almost a whole year before folks start reading the article next year! Go ahead and give it a try! BTW, somebody asked for a citation in the controversy section despite there being 2 there already. I just removed the [citation needed] tag as clearly not needed. Smallbones(smalltalk) 20:59, 28 November 2013 (UTC)
Whoops that was in Thanksgiving (United States) [2]. If anybody can figure out a way to make these 2 articles divide up the material in a way that makes sense, do please let us all know. Smallbones(smalltalk) 21:05, 28 November 2013 (UTC)

Commonwealth, not State[edit]

The caption for the photo says state of PA, but PA is a commonwealth, not a state. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.222.211.235 (talk) 06:11, 29 November 2013 (UTC)

check out the official website of Pennsylvania: PA.gov the Official Web Site of the State of Pennsylvania Rjensen (talk) 06:36, 29 November 2013 (UTC)

PA.gov says Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, The Key Stone State. Furthermore the article on Pennsylvania refers to it as a Commonwealth

The term 'commonwealth' in this case is vestigial. Pennsylvania (as well as KY, VA and MA) is a US State that uses 'commonwealth' as part of its official name. The title 'Commonwealth' in this case however, insofar as it applies to US States, has no real impact on its clasification as a US State (see: Commonwealth (U.S. state) if you have any further questions. Ryecatcher773 (talk) 03:32, 28 March 2014 (UTC)

Puritans were not radical reformers[edit]

See radical Reformation. The term has a specific meaning and the puritans do not fit. --JFH (talk) 01:13, 24 May 2014 (UTC)

OK. Thanks for clarifying. Zyxwv99 (talk) 13:13, 24 May 2014 (UTC)