Talk:Thatching

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[Untitled][edit]

---Needs to be rewritten---

Under "Thatch Material":

"There are more thatched roofs in the the hood and the slums than in any other European country"

Makes no sense. Compare what to what? When rewording this, please omit the slang phrase "the hood" which is a shortened form of "neighborhood".

Adriennes (talk) 21:16, 24 April 2010 (UTC)

a link should be added[edit]

... with :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Plague

"Thatched roofs (which had provided splendid places for rats to live) were also forbidden within the city, and remain forbidden under modern codes"

Seems to have been forgotten !!! But I think that if you have rats living above your head, you end up automatically having dust charged with rat's fecaes particles and much worst into your food, and you multiply the chances of interspecies diseaes transmission !!!!

How does a rat live in a densely packed mass of thatch? and don't they prefer nice holes in the ground? Mice are more your loft dwellers. GraemeLeggett 19:03, 28 April 2006 (UTC)

Re: Flammability[edit]

As per dictionary.com[1], flammable and inflammable are considered synonyms. However, inflammable runs the risk of confusion as the latin prefix in- may be mistakenly thought to be the negating english in-. If the two are considered synonyms, then deciding between the two is an issue of style and practicality. Flammable is (imo) clearly more practical. -Kasreyn

Re Insurance[edit]

"and insurance premiums are high because few companies will insure a thatched property - and those that do realise that owners have little choice but to accept their charges."

That is a load of rubbish ! The reason people with thatched roofs pay higher premiums is because in the event of a fire, more damage is likely to occur than with a tiled or other style of roof and that it costs more to replace a thatched roof than a standard roof.

Both of these points were stated earlier in the text....

James


Propaganda[edit]

I know little about thatching but this page has become propaganda. It doesn't even really cover thatching so much as it covers thatched rooves of which there is already an article. Editing is needed. --Ryuukuro 16:58, 28 April 2006 (UTC)


"last" century?[edit]

"In the early years of the last century thatching was in decline". Is the writer really referring to the 20th century? This sounds like text lifted from some uncited 20th century document.

Flammabilty[edit]

Under the section "Flammability" it says they are at no greater risk from fire than other roofs but under "Disadvantages is says they are. Which is right? 172.188.149.60 10:45, 19 June 2007 (UTC)

WikiProject Food and drink Tagging[edit]

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Norfolk Reed[edit]

I believe that Norfolk reed is still harvested commercially from the Norfolk Broads, and what people supppose to be straw is often in fact reed. Sorry do not know the details. 78.149.201.215 (talk) 13:44, 27 February 2010 (UTC)

50 years![edit]

I'm not an expert on thatching but as I understand it the best quality thatch is a reed thatch, and this is unlikely to last 50 years (30 years would be more realistic) so to claim a straw thatch would last this length of time seems to be stretching it a bit. Can anyone provide a reference for this part of the article?--Ykraps (talk) 16:35, 1 October 2010 (UTC)

Sedge[edit]

Sedge currently appears only in the introduction, where the link is misleading. So have added the generum (Cladium mariscus) temporarily there for now. Material at this site might be usefil for improving the materials section? Martinevans123 (talk) 18:07, 3 October 2010 (UTC)

EU law[edit]

There is a reference to a law (Plant Variety and Seeds Act 1964) that supposedly prohibits the use of an old variety of wheat in the EU. This is a UK-specific law and has existed for much longer than the UK has been a member of the European Union. Maybe this needs to be reformulated? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2.218.220.8 (talk) 15:41, 28 April 2013 (UTC)