Talk:The Art of Being Right

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Expansion[edit]

Please expand this someone. I've just done the initial work in putting the page up - sections need short descriptions. Wikidea 10:28, 4 October 2007 (UTC)

Is it really worth having a section describing the contents of ach of the sections of the book? (I am not sure whether or not these are chapters, because I haven;t seen the book.) There are already wikipeida entries for many of the forms of fallacy covered - sorry, I really don't want to track them all down now, I am hoping that people can make the links tothe ones they know about - and the other forms of fallacy are pretty clear from the title, without any explanation. Anarchia 19:50, 5 October 2007 (UTC)
They are the chapters of the essay - you can just have a look at the external link at the bottom of the page. Yes, each fallacy needs a short summary of the idea. Wikidea 21:01, 5 October 2007 (UTC)

Surely, it should be possible to link the vast majority of sections to articles on specific fallacies? Anyone up to it? --93.220.88.198 (talk) 00:14, 22 July 2012 (UTC)

Question[edit]

Does anyone know, was this published as a self standing article? Was it published with a collection of other essays? Wikidea 17:28, 8 February 2010 (UTC)

Found one book: Kleinere Schriften under the chapter, Eristische Dialektik. Die Kunst, Recht zu Behalten is the sub title. Wikidea 17:32, 8 February 2010 (UTC)

The Eristic Dialectics were found in Schopenhauer’s papers among his Manuscript Remains (Carton 29, part 14) after his death. It consisted of 44 pages which listed 38 stratagems that could be used to win disputes. He wrote them in 1830-1831. See Arthur Hübscher’s editorial note in Manuscript Remains, vol. 3, p. 723. In his Parerga and Paralipomena, vol. 2, § 26, Schopenhauer explained that he lost interest in this essay because as he grew older he disliked “throwing light on all these lurking places of narrow-mindedness and incapacity that are so closely allied to obstinacy, vanity, and dishonesty.” Julius Frauenstädt first published them as a complete essay in Aus Schopenhauer’s handschriftlichen Nachlass, Leipzig, 1864, pp. 3f.Lestrade (talk) 14:12, 22 July 2012 (UTC)Lestrade