Talk:The Canterbury Tales

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Former good article nominee The Canterbury Tales was a Language and literature good articles nominee, but did not meet the good article criteria at the time. There are suggestions below for improving the article. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
June 6, 2012 Good article nominee Not listed
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Subjective?[edit]

"Towering achievement of Western culture" is debatable (although I personally agree with it). Qazsedcftgbhujmkol (talk) 16:53, 13 January 2010 (UTC)

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I agree; I think it should be clear to the Editors that that's an opinion which needs to be referenced for support. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.199.204.112 (talk) 10:08, 10 April 2013 (UTC)

Unreliable Narrator[edit]

The claim in the introduction that "Chaucer created literature's first known unreliable narrator" is neither true nor supported by citation. Indeed just following the link to the wiki page Unreliable narrator shows claims of earlier texts (including Arabian Nights) featuring unreliable narrators, with citations to back them up.

language table revision?[edit]

The 3-column table in the Language section seems a little sub-optimal when it comes to alignment. I wonder if something like this would serve better?

'Wepyng and waylyng, care and oother sorwe ˈweːpɪŋɡ and ˈwailɪŋɡ ‖ ˈkaːr‿and ˈoːðər ˈsɔrwə ‖ 'Weeping and wailing, care and other sorrow
I knowe ynogh, on even and a-morwe,' iː ˈknɔu əˈnoːx ‖ ɔn ˈɛːvən and aˈmɔrwə ‖ I know enough, in the evening and in the morning,'
Quod the Marchant, 'and so doon oother mo ˈkwɔd ðə ˈmartʃant ‖ and ˈsɔː ˈdoːn ˈoːðər ˈmɔː ‖ said the Merchant, 'and so does many another
That wedded been.'[1] ðat ˈwɛddəd ˈbeːn ‖[2] who has been married.'

I'm not a tables expert, so perhaps someone else can come up with something better? Phil wink (talk) 02:22, 30 December 2012 (UTC)

capitalization and italicization[edit]

I notice that the article is inconsistently capitalized and italicized. Is the proper title "The Canterbury Tales" (in which case I guess "The" should be capitalized and italicized) or just "Canterbury Tales" (perhaps like the Odyssey)? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 110.70.31.142 (talk) 09:36, 3 January 2013 (UTC)

Thanks for the alert. The Canterbury Tales task force has just recently been formed. We're still in an early organizational phase, but one (I hope) of the first things we'll be doing in the coming weeks is developing a "mini style sheet" for topics like this, and then beginning to bring articles up to speed. Anyone is welcome to join, comment, or just gawk.
...and for the record, my unofficial opinion is: The Canterbury Tales; but with the option of removing the "The" for grammatical purposes, as in: Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Phil wink (talk) 23:45, 3 January 2013 (UTC)

"Order" is too academic.[edit]

To be frank, I find it more than a little annoying that while there are sections and articles about the "order" of the tales included, nowhere can one find an actual listing of the stories with their actual titles. The best one can do is click on each abbreviation one at a time, which is ridiculously inconvenient. I honestly feel that this is an example of "academic snobbery"; it seems to have been clearly written by an "Academic," writing for other Academics *only,* and that defeats the purpose of Wikipedia. Think about it.

68.199.204.112 (talk) 10:05, 10 April 2013 (UTC)

Inaccuracy in Decameron comparison[edit]

The article asserts that the Decameron "features a number of narrators who tell stories along a journey they have undertaken (to flee from the Black Plague)." This is a little inaccurate. When the Decameron stories are told, the narrators are already at their destination (the villa outside Florence).

Dave Andrew (talk) 16:04, 5 July 2014 (UTC)

  1. ^ Text from The Riverside Chaucer, ed. by Larry D. Benson, 3rd edn (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987), p. 153.
  2. ^ Based on the information in Norman Davies, 'Language and Versification', in The Riverside Chaucer, ed. by Larry D. Benson, 3rd edn (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987), pp. xxv–xli.