Talk:The Island of Doctor Moreau

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Wrong[edit]

The author of this article has never read the book and based the summary off of the 1996 movie. It's obvious when you think that DNA and electro-shock devices wouldn't exist in 1896.

I've since changed the heading to "Movie plot". Feel free to write a summary of the book. And please sign your posts by typing 4 tildes (~) after your statements. - Cybjorg 17:08, 8 November 2005 (UTC)
Now that I've had the time, I've cleaned up the article to reflect the original nature of the novel, with additional references to the movie adaptations and other instances in pop culture. - Cybjorg 10:31, 14 November 2005 (UTC)
Just to add on to what you just said about references (which was about a year ago), there was an episode of Courage the Cowardly Dog based on this novel. 203.120.68.75 19:52, 16 September 2006 (UTC)

Gene Wolfe[edit]

Can anyone confirm if Gene Wolfe's The Island of Dr. Death and Other Stories, or any of his other similarly titled stories, is an homage of any sort to Moreau? I couldn't find an answer through Google and I don't know enough of eith story to speculate myself. If so, I suppose it ought to be added to the 'Popular Culture' section. flip 03:05, 2 April 2006 (UTC)

chimeras: "it" or "he/her"?[edit]

I'm not sure if these "hybrids" should be referred to as a non-human object(it) or a human one (he/her).

Eg:

...and in self-defense [Dr Moreau] kills him.

They're sophonts, I'd use human pronouns. Besides animals often get referred to by gender from time to time too anyway, especially when they have names. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 149.152.132.74 (talk) 07:20, 6 April 2011 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Dr moreau.JPG[edit]

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BetacommandBot 04:56, 16 September 2007 (UTC)

'Plot' summary?[edit]

Despite its status as an influential novel, I have no idea of exactly what this work is actually about. There's no short summary of exactly what happens in the novel, I've never read the actual work, I have very little background to put the rest of the article's coverage into perspective. I'm noting the stubbiness of this section -- can someone expand? --Stratadrake 01:29, 21 October 2007 (UTC)

Furry Fandom[edit]

Should/could links to articles on "Furries" be included? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 203.211.75.108 (talk) 10:06, 17 February 2009 (UTC)

can't see why they would be... 149.152.132.74 (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 07:22, 6 April 2011 (UTC).

Trivial Allusions and references[edit]

In what is part of a larger battle here at Wikipedia to keep the trivial allusions out of the main novel articles, I'm pasting all of the allusions and references from the main page here. If you would like to discussion the worthiness of any allusions, please keep the discussion here and then move them to the main page as we get consensus. A lot of these allusions are not worth elevating to the main page. If someone wants to create a separate article on this topic, and turn these trivial allusions into something, then I think that would be acceptable.

References in other works[edit]

A popular story that has influenced many works, mainly about mad scientists creating chimeras. The following are some of the works which are closely related to Moreau and his story:

Novels, comics, and printed works[edit]

Films, TV, and screen-based works[edit]

Computer and role-playing games[edit]

  • FarCry also revolves around a scientist creating chimeric creatures on an archipelago.
  • The Dungeons & Dragons game setting Ravenloft includes Frantisek Markov, the darklord of Markovia, who is responsible for the creation of creatures called Broken Ones and has the ability to shape-shift into any form of animal but must maintain his human head and is cursed in that he can never again have a humanoid body.
  • The role-playing game d20 Modern has rules for genetically engineered animal-men hybrids called moreaus, which come in several forms based in different animal species, including feline, dolphin, and bear moreau.
  • In the video game Sly 3: Honor Among Thieves, the villain Dr. M is based on Doctor Moreau, and even shares the affinity for splicing animals.
  • In the computer game Impossible Creatures, Dr. Eric Chanikov, in a secluded island, invents the Sigma Technology, which allows two animals to be fused into a new creation.
  • The game Vivisector by ActionFourms is based on The Island of Doctor Moreau.
  • In the post-apocalyptic computer role-playing game Fallout, the villain known as "The Master" was a doctor who was expelled by his community and is now sending mutants (of his creation) into the world. His name is Dr. Richard Grey but he changed it from Dr. Richard Moreau upon his expulsion. [1]
  • In the online game Runescape there is a quest players can take wherein a group of men called the "Beast Makers" are led by Dr. Moreau.
  • Also the 2007 hit "BioShock", maintains a huge resemblance to the storyline of "The Island of Doctor Moreau"

Music[edit]

  • The electronic group Infected Mushroom refers to Dr. Moreau in one of their songs, "Over Mode".
  • The book inspired the name of hiphop group House of Pain. Several songs and certain versions of their debut album contain words from the book.
  • The band Oingo Boingo's song "No Spill Blood" on their album Good for Your Soul is based on the book and the 1933 movie. It makes reference to Moreau's "House of Pain" and the punishments for breaking Moreau's laws.
  • The Devo song Jocko Homo, as well as the title of a 1978 album, takes its line "Are we not men?" indirectly from the book through the 1933 movie, and before that from Shylock's soliloquy in Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice.
  • Rodan, a rapper from the New York based hip hop group Monsta Island Czars, refers to himself as Dr. Moreau sometimes and references Dr. Moreau in his songs.
  • The Italian neoclassical band Ataraxia featured a song on their album Arcana Eco entitled "The Island of Doctor Moreau".
  • The music video for Diana Ross's single Eaten Alive is inspired by the novel.
  • The third song "Pride of Creation" on the 2008/2009 album Tinnitus Sanctus by the European power metal band Edguy prominently features themes from the novel.

Victorianist (talk) 20:56, 23 April 2009 (UTC)

Missed a few[edit]

Adaptations[edit]

The novel has been made into a movie on three occasions:


Other[edit]

Victorianist (talk) 20:58, 23 April 2009 (UTC)

Proofreading needed for sentence![edit]

The crew pushes him back into the lifeboat from which they rescued they stole his money truly intends to abandon him, the islanders take pity and end up coming back for him. -From the plot summary. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.171.143.175 (talk) 21:13, 12 June 2009 (UTC)

How is this a B-Class article[edit]

There's a plot and.... nothing. Nothing about the themes, effects on culture, influence on authors etc... This is a long stub. - superβεεcat  05:32, 11 September 2009 (UTC)

An Overlooked Adaptation?[edit]

Terror Is A Man (1959) directed by Gerardo de Leon from a script by Paul Harber. While H.G. Wells' Island of Dr. Moreau is not credited, the plot is clearly inspired by the classic science fiction novel. In the movie, Dr. Girard uses surgery to transform a panther into a humanoid creature. The creature escapes and goes on a rampage. The plot includes a clueless outsider mystified by the doctor and his friends. The movie was filmed in the Philippine Islands. IMDB listing The movie has the gimmick of a warning bell before particularly shocking sequence. In true 1960s drive-in movie fashion, Terror is a Man" is also known as Blood Creature USA, Creature from Blood Island, Criatura Sangrenta, Island of Terror, and The Gory Creatures.Naaman Brown (talk) 23:38, 8 February 2010 (UTC)

What about the concept in the 2010 film Splice? Both of these concepts deal with merging multiple species' DNA. Jeanlovecomputers (talk) 03:32, 6 June 2010 (UTC)

The book is all masculine![edit]

There's no mention of women in the book! All the book says is "all Men" and "Men", never "people"! Is that book really for only men, or am I just picky? --Angeldeb82 (talk) 04:37, 12 January 2012 (UTC)

Fox-bear witch I presume is female. Since all the animals are manufactured by Moreau, they have no need of reproductive bits. The life boat is the Lady Vain. An oblique reference to varicose veins, perhaps? Certainly more subtle than Lady Big Butt, anyway. 220.244.247.105 (talk) 02:23, 28 August 2014 (UTC)

Public reaction[edit]

You ought to mention the violent public outrage that greeted this novel, which was regarded as obscene because it involved vivisection. 109.154.14.8 (talk) 12:04, 5 April 2012 (UTC)

cheese[edit]

in the book he eats mouldy cheese — Preceding unsigned comment added by 5.69.42.250 (talk) 13:43, 28 September 2013 (UTC)

an exercise in youthful blasphemy[edit]

More than 100 websites attribute this quote to H. G. Wells. Not one, not a single one, can cite the source. As Hitler's paropagandists stated, "If you repeat a lie often enough, it becomes the truth." How on God's green earth do we know Wells really said this? I don't think he did. Prove me wrong! DanQuigley 03:14, 19 May 2014 (UTC)

  1. ^ http://fallout.wikia.com/wiki/Richard_Grey