Talk:The Killing Time

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Killing Times[edit]

My expansion aims at explain the real facts behind the Killing Time. It had nothing at all to do-it has to be stressed-with armed resistance to the imposition of Episcopacy. Rcpaterson 01:02, 6 June 2006 (UTC)

James Guthrie[edit]

The caption on the image "Rev. James Guthrie, executed in 1661 for criticising Charles II's reintroduction of episcopacy" is a simplification at best.

James Guthrie (c. 1612–1661) was executed after the Restoration for high treason for his support of the "Western Remonstrance" (opposition to the rescinding of the Act of Classes), and his rejection of King's ecclesiastical authority. He was not the only man executed in 1661 for high treason (three others were and they had all actively opposed the Royalist faction in 1650-51).

That the authorities wanted him dead because of the trouble he might cause post the Restoration (rather than actions taken a decade before) may well be true -- similar arguments can be advanced for the execution of Major Thomas Harrison -- but such a POV needs an authoritative modern academic source, and not an old source that has an axe to grind on this issue. -- PBS (talk) 14:39, 3 December 2012 (UTC)