Talk:The King and Country debate

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Winston Churchill's "The Second World War" mention[edit]

W.Churchill mentions the debates again in that book, there's a quite interesting couple of paragraphs and I think a line or two could be quoted. --CopperKettle 17:25, 28 June 2009 (UTC)

Correction on speaker[edit]

This article erroneously recorded Mr. David Graham as opposing the motion. As Ceadel's journal article confirms, Graham spoke in favour of the motion (which, as Ceadel further shows, he had himself drafted in the first place). Nandt1 (talk) 15:21, 24 July 2011 (UTC)

Merge Oxford Oath[edit]

Oxford Oath is a much shorter article which mainly seems to be about the impact of the debate in the U.S., so could be merged with this one... AnonMoos (talk) 04:48, 6 August 2012 (UTC)

I think that "Oxford Oath" is important enough to stand on its own. אורח לרגע (talk) 06:55, 14 August 2012 (UTC)
I agree, this should be a no-brainer. There's no particularly good reason why the two cannot be contained within the same article and this seems the preferable title.Brigade Piron (talk) 20:22, 22 May 2014 (UTC)

The "Erich von Richthofen " letter -"very likely a hoax".[edit]

In his long article on the "King and Country" debate, "The King and Country Debate, 1933: Student Politics, Pacifism and the Dictators". Martin Ceadel mentions the letter from "Erich von Richthofen" which appeared in the Daily Telegraph in 4 May 1965, and mentioned in the R. V. Jones book " Most Secret War". Ceadel points out a number of facts which express doubt about the letter's authenticity:

"The initial point to be made is that the one explicit and ostensibly first-hand testimony, that of Erich von Richthofen in his letter to the Daily Telegraph of 4 May 1965 quoted in the first paragraph of this article, is of doubtful authenticity. The only address given in the letter is Newton Abbot and an inquiry through the local newspaper has revealed no knowledge of anyone of that name living there in the mid-sixties or any other time; the only member of the von Richthofen family of that name is now a professor in the University of Toronto, was never in the German army, and denies having written the letter; and the German military archives have no record of any General Staff or senior army officer of that name in that period. It seems very likely, therefore, that the letter is a hoax".

In addition, a JSTOR search for "Erich von Richthofen" and "Daily Telegraph" only shows one result, Ceadel's article. http://www.jstor.org/action/doAdvancedSearch?q0=%22erich+von+richthofen%22&f0=all&c1=AND&q1=%22daily+telegraph%22&f1=all&wc=on&fc=off&Search=Search&sd=&ed=&la=&pt=&isbn=

Surely if a member of the German General Staff had given verifiable information on Hitler's motives it would be mentioned in many more articles?

I am not aware of anyone who has challenged Ceadel's statements about the letter' dubious authenticity. Unless someone can state proof that the letter is not a fake, then references to it should be removed from this article immediately. 176.61.97.121 (talk) 20:22, 29 January 2014 (UTC)