Talk:The Knight's Tale

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Film[edit]

Is it correct to say that the film 'A Knight's Tale' is based on Chaucer's story of the same name? I see no points in common other than the title.

Well, there is Chaucer. And the pardoner and the summoner (IIRC) :-)
As I recall, the article makes it very clear that the connection is very tenuous at best, but I think there is at least a slight connection.
Atlant 11:04, 20 Apr 2005 (UTC)

Actually, The Movie "A Knight's Tale" is directly based on Chaucer's "The Knight's Tale". In both stories, the two main characters go to tournament over one girl. However, there are conflicting details, that is the overall story of both tales.

Now if you wish to search further into the subject, one could say that the movie is a story of the making of The Canterbury Tales. In the movie, Chaucer comes into contact with a great variety of people of medieval society and in the end of the movie he states that he's going to write the story, "All human activity lies within the artist's scope" which is an allusion to the writing of the Canterbury Tales. There are all sorts of allusions like this one throughout the movie, you just have to know what to look for.

Anonymous 11:28 AM, 11 Dec 2005

"It tries, but fails, to introduce many typical aspects of knighthood..."

Sounds POV to me. Makes critical judgement about effectiveness of Tale. May adjust. SheltonP 13:23, 8 March 2007 (UTC)

Emeleye[edit]

Emeleye actually first prays for the two of them to forget the whole thing, as she'd rather not marry, and wants to remain a virgin. The goddess Diane appears to her and tells her otherwise. Gaylegoh 19:22, 3 October 2007 (UTC)

Boccacio[edit]

I don't follow this "Teseida delle nozze di Emilia by Giovanni Boccaccio is the source of the tale. "The Knight's Tale", though, is a very loose translation, shortening Chaucer's 9000 line epic to a little over 2000 lines. Although some of the plot is lost, an undercurrent of philosophy is added by Boccaccio, mainly inspired by the Consolation of Philosophy of Boethius which Boccaccio had also translated." -- Beardo (talk) 08:05, 30 December 2007 (UTC)

This is terrible![edit]

Who wrote this? Seriously. "The Knight and his tale supposedly embody the ideas of chivalry, but Chaucer's Knight, a book by Terry Jones, portrays the knight as a mercenary and far from a gallant, ethical, gentle character (though this theory has been widely disputed by the academic community)."

Terry Jones? Who the hell is Terry Jones? In line 74 of the prologue, Chaucer describes the knight as "Her was true, a perfect gentile-knight".

Mike (talk) 01:21, 29 October 2009 (UTC)

It's a good thing we only invented irony in 2004, otherwise Chaucer could have been using it.FiendishThingie (talk) 11:47, 22 February 2010 (UTC)
Yes, though I agree with FiendishThingie, the narrator, and consequently the narration, of the Tales is actually a hotly debated topic. Though Chaucer, as the author of the work, is certainly treating the knight with irony, it is uncertain whether Chaucer is the narrator and is directly speaking about the knight sarcastically, or that the narrator is just another character in the tales and may genuinely believe that knight is "perfect gentile". [1] Jwalkfour (talk) 13:37, 30 October 2012 (UTC)

Poetics[edit]

Should the sentence "The story is in iambic pentameter using 10 syllables for every line" be emended to say "The story is written in iambic pentameter end-rhymed couplets"? Iambs have two syllables and pentameter implies five of them (hence the ten syllables)--so the present sentence is redundant. It also seems that it would be good to mention the rhyming couplets.Mm2cat (talk) 20:31, 8 September 2011 (UTC)

  1. ^ Kimple, Ben (June 1953). "The Narrator of the Canterbury Tales". ELH (Johns Hopkins UP) 20 (2): 77–86. Retrieved 30 October 2012.