Talk:The Social Contract

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Opening comment[edit]

Im not quite an expert, but I believe that Hobbes's social contract was between the people in order to create a sovereign(government). In other words, the sovereign is not a party to this covenant therefore it would be inacccurate to describe his contract as "between the people and their government"



That's correct... quoting from Hobbes's Leviathan:

"It is a real unity of them all, in one and the same person, made by covenant of every man with every man, in such a manner as if every man should say to every man, I authorize and give up my right of governing myself, to this man, or to this assembly of men, on this condition, that thou give up thy right to him, and authorize all his actions in a like manner."

Rousseau may not have a particularly detailed plan for how the Sovereign (i.e. the people) should enact legislation, but he does strongly advocate popular assembly, as in classical antiquity.


"Rousseau may not have a particularly detailed plan for how the Sovereign (i.e. the people) should enact legislation, but he does strongly advocate popular assembly, as in classical antiquity."

That is wrong. Legislation should be, and must be, enacteed by government. It is very clear in that manner. The form of which the government takes and the derivation of such a government is what Rousseau is not clear on. This obscurity only proves that there is more than one way and Rousseau did not want to pretend he had the answer.

Just becareful on how you phrase things. Although he didn't directly explain how assemblies should form, he did praise the Roman system (Book IV, Chapter IV). Again, what he was clear on is that the government 'enacts' legislation, ie applies the law.

Please[edit]

Sign yeer posts. Sioraf (talk) 05:22, 29 June 2009 (UTC)

Rousseau and Revolution[edit]

The paragraph on the influence of The Social Contract could be improved by expanding on both its positive and negative effects on the course of the French Revolution. The Terror as well as the Declaration of Rights of Man and Citizen have been traced back to Rousseau. Dactylion (talk) 17:20, 12 August 2009 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

Moved to The Social Contract. The is the name of the book as used in the notes within the article. Vegaswikian (talk) 03:42, 9 December 2009 (UTC)

Social Contract (Rousseau)The Social Contract, Or Principles of Political Right — MoS conformation to article about a book. Alternatively, it should be moved to just The Social Contract. I note that all of the diasmbig pages/hatnotes to point to The Social Contract, Or Principles of Political Right rather than to Social Contract (Rousseau). Robert K S (talk) 14:06, 2 December 2009 (UTC)

  • Move to The Social Contract, which already redirects here anyway, is the common English name, and meets guidelines at WP:THE and WP:NC-BK. Subtitles are generally not used for books unless needed for disambiguation, which is not the case here. Station1 (talk) 19:23, 2 December 2009 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

In Our Time[edit]

The BBC programme In Our Time presented by Melvyn Bragg has an episode which may be about this subject (if not moving this note to the appropriate talk page earns cookies). You can add it to "External links" by pasting {{In Our Time|The Social Contract|b008w3xm|The_Social_Contract}}. Rich Farmbrough, 03:22, 16 September 2010 (UTC).

Overview[edit]

City states and nations.

"In light of all this, Rousseau argues that, like his native Geneva, small city-states are the form of nation in which freedom can best flourish"

There is a very large difference between a state and a nation. I'm not being pedantic about this either. The two concepts are completely different. Nations didnt truely exist till end of the 19th centuary, around 1870 etc. Please read Ernest Gellners Nations and Nationalism, Age of empire (Hobsbawn) et al. A better wording would be: "In light of all this, Rousseau argues that, like his native Geneva, small city-states would be easier to govern than states which cover larger geographical areas such as russia."

86.178.54.77 (talk) 17:06, 22 October 2010 (UTC)

This section has bad writing.