Talk:The Spiral Dance

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Sentence Removed[edit]

I just removed this:

See holocaust denial for another example of how an uncertainty about EXACT figures has allowed people to assert incredibly innaccurate figures.

Because it seems really irrelevant and like the writer was trying to associate Starhawk with holocaust denial, which is patently absurd as her ancestry is Jewish. Arianna 23:05, 1 April 2007 (UTC)

It should be noted that some Jewish people have been involved in Holocaust denial... not that I was accusing Starhawk of this.

I was making the point that both Holocaust denial and claiming that nine million people were killed in the Witch Hunt are forms of intellectual fraud, something of which Starhawk IS guilty. The mechanisms she uses - pointing to an uncertainty over exact figures and using this to "prove" that a ridiculously innacurate figure "could" be true or to cast doubt over the actual figures - are the same as those used by Holocaust deniers. I think I'll put it back ,though I may rewrite it first.Steve3742 12:39, 5 April 2007 (UTC)

How does one webpage show that the majority of neo-pagans believe in the nine million figure? I can find plenty of neo-pagan publications debunking the nine-million figure (indeed, many neo-pagans are particulary interested in setting this issue straight), but that doesn't prove that only a small minority of neo-pagans believe this. Deducing a majority opinion from one website is just as logically unsound. Not all Frenchmen are Napoleon!86.47.160.33 (talk) 14:05, 21 April 2008 (UTC)