Talk:The Star-Spangled Banner

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Changes in spelling of the lyrics[edit]

There are several differences in the spelling of some of the words in the lyrics between the original handwritten copy and what is printed in our article. Perhaps these should be noted. For example, the fifth line of the first verse has a singular "bomb bursting in air", but we now sing "bombs". Has someone researched where these changes were introduced and why they were made? --Thomprod (talk) 17:16, 2 July 2011 (UTC)

Dunno, but the 1814 printed copy has the modern version. Maybe when he took it to the publisher he had some discussions with them to "polish" the wording a bit. ←Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? carrots→ 17:27, 2 July 2011 (UTC)

Sheet Music[edit]

The Sheet Music on the page is not the type that is normally used. There are numerous times (such as the first two notes) where the sheet music has two eighth notes and normally it has dotted eighth and sixteenth. Also at parts (such as "proudly we" in the first line) it has three quarter notes when normally it is dotted quarter, eighth, quarter. 67.86.150.191 (talk) 18:13, 9 October 2011 (UTC)

It appears to be copyrighted 1917, so maybe things were done a little differently then? ←Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? carrots→ 18:28, 9 October 2011 (UTC)

I doubt it, looking at the 1915 song version on the wikipedia page, both of the changes I pointed out were implemented. Although there were a few other noticeable differences from the more modern versions I've heard. I listened to all the rest of the songs on this page, and they are all very similar to the more modern arrangements I've heard. So while there has been a bit of space for interpretation with different arrangements, I haven't heard any arrangement that plays it like that sheet music does. 67.86.150.191 (talk) 05:10, 10 October 2011 (UTC)

The US Air Force has sheet music posted online in PDF files, and I think other governmental websites have it. So more can be added, but I would rather have maybe just 1 from 1917, one from today and from different periods. User:Zscout370 (Return Fire) 05:51, 10 October 2011 (UTC)

The sheet music shown in the article (as of 2012-04-27) is really a simplified version of the song, not the actual national anthem. It's "dumbed down" a bit, and I don't think there's any reason to present this simpleton edition simply because of the copyright date displayed (on what is a public domain piece), or the fact that it's available as a free PDF. In the context of it's status as the US national anthem, a government source should be used. The sheet music, as shown, is clearly wrong. Although it might be suitable for young children first learning the song, it doesn't belong in an encyclopedia. Deleting it, and thus having no sheet music in the article, is clearly preferable to displaying this incorrect version. Anyone can publish sheet music to this song, without regard to quality control, but that doesn't make such sheet music a definitive encyclopedic source. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 139.68.134.1 (talk) 14:10, 27 April 2012 (UTC)

We celebrate the anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence; to wit, Independence Day, not July the Fourth.[edit]

I have been reading several articles related to the United States National Anthem and songs that have been proposed as the U.S. national hymn and have found a disturbing reference made in each article. The reference is to our celebration of the "Fourth of July" as a national holiday.

We do not celebrate the fourth day of the seventh month of the Gregorian, or civil, calendar! That day has no intrinsic importance or value to our American history or our celebration of our accomplishments. What we do celebrate is the anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. That day, which is the anniversary of the 1776 Continental Congress' signing of our declaration to the European countries and territories of the reasons why we were breaking with England. Had we been using the Julian calendar still, our anniversary celebration would be on the 23rd of June.

I believe that this distinction/correction needs to be made on all articles pertaining to U.S. History and celebrations. Likewise the same courtesy and relevancy needs to be made to all other incorrect references to country's celebration days. If you believed current advertising and marketing you would think that all of Mexico celebrated their independence on "Cinco de Mayo"; a gross error. Nobody in Mexico celebrates the 5th day of the 5th month of the civil calendar. Primarily only the State of Puebla celebrates the victory of the Mexicans over the French forces at Puebla de Los Angeles on the 5th of May, 1862. In America it's just another day people have found to 'parrr-teee'.

In allowing the usage of current calendar date to substitute for the name of the actual anniversary celebration, you encourage a general laziness, and disregard for each country and community's achievements and historical culture. As the 'encyclopedia to the world', I don't think that would meet your intentions or expectations of excellence in documentation.

Please consider having the appropriate corrections to all articles dealing with celebration and history of any country, culture, or people.

Yours Sincerely, SC -- 98.232.52.184 -- 23:40, 20 May 2012 (UTC)

In America, "July 4th" is synonymous with "Independence Day". ←Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? carrots→ 02:01, 21 May 2012 (UTC)
United States Declaration of Independence. Buffs (talk) 03:10, 21 May 2012 (UTC)

star spangled banner[edit]

does anybody know what the star spangled banner really means?? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.128.23.242 (talk) 15:48, 4 September 2012 (UTC)

I think it means a flag (banner) strewn (spangled) with stars. In other words, a flag with stars on it. Skinsmoke (talk) 17:12, 21 September 2012 (UTC)

It Was Never a Poem[edit]

Sorry, it was not a poem later set to music. This is a common misconception. What are the chances that one could find a song that perfectly matched an existing poem? Key deliberately wrote new words to the song, "To Anacreon in Heaven." It wasn't even the first time he had written new words to that song. In that period, it was common to write new topical words to popular songs. — Preceding unsigned comment added by BrandonShw (talkcontribs) 18:23, 18 January 2013 (UTC)

The article could be clearer on that point, but it's not in dispute. Note that the contemporary printing of the poem suggests the Anacreon song as the tune. And finding a song that matches a poem is no big deal. Poems with the same meter are interchangeable as songs. For example, "America the Beautiful" and "Auld Lang Syne" can be sung to each other's music seamlessly. ←Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? carrots→ 18:52, 18 January 2013 (UTC)
Can you document that, BrandonShw? --Thnidu (talk) 18:29, 13 July 2014 (UTC)
This article also starts off: "It is also among some of the world's national anthems that are based on a poem, along with the Hymn to Liberty, the national anthem of both Greece and Cyprus." It is obvious how mentioning the Greek national anthem in any context here makes any sense in terms of an introduction to the Star Spangled Banner. One might as well as say, the Star Spangled Banner is a national anthem, much like "O Canada" or "Rule Brittania (or whatever they use)" — Preceding unsigned comment added by 192.158.48.18 (talk) 19:24, 6 August 2013 (UTC)