Talk:The War of the Worlds

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I have minded my grammar...[edit]

I was the anonymous editor who corrected the possessive forms of Wells's name. I neglected to sign in before beginning my edits. Rest assured they weren't drive-bys. In my education(up to Bachelor of Science) and in several grammatical texts I have in my possession, the possessive form of a proper noun ending in -S is to add "'s". "Saint James's Hospital" for example. Excepting certain entities which choose to have their names in the form of simply adding the apostrophe. To do so implies plurality, which there is obviously not in Wells's case.

"Form the possessive singular of nouns with 's.

Here are some examples:

   * James's cat
   * Mrs. Jones's attorney
   * Dr. Seuss's book

"

My edits were grammatically accurate. I am not reverting them simply because I would like discussion rather than an edit war over something so trivial.

Sparf (talk) 16:19, 17 June 2009 (UTC)

I would like to respond to this, so forgive me for undoing your removal. Your texts say these things, I have no doubt. But, we should follow WP:MOS in this, which quite easily/quickly says that either style is appropriate. I added a link in the edit summary. Further, when something is written in one style on Wikipedia (consistently in any one article), it generally remains in that style. Thanks for checking back. --Izno (talk) 19:48, 17 June 2009 (UTC)
Actually, Izno, you reverted one thing he did that you shouldn't have, at least not a straight "undo" of it. He turned a "Well's" into a "Wells's" and you made it "Well's" again. I dare say all three of us agree that that is wrong. --Ted Watson (talk) 21:08, 17 June 2009 (UTC)
Hah. Trudat. --Izno (talk) 21:40, 17 June 2009 (UTC)
Thanks for the link. I had never been taught any other way in my many many years of education, nor in any of my texts on the subject. I guess I need to get some more texts, eh? Anyway, trying to be more productive to the Wikipedia community, so it's best that I learn these things now. And no worries about undoing my removal. I always favor fruitful discussion.Sparf (talk) 03:41, 18 June 2009 (UTC)

The WP:MOS, in the Grammar (National varieties of English Styles) section, suggests that: "An article on a topic that has strong ties to a particular English-speaking nation uses the appropriate variety of English for that nation. For example: Tolkien's 'The Lord of the Rings' (British English)". For more detail on the possessive case, the MOS points to the "Apostrophe" page, where the named authorities seem to lean towards a preference for 's, though the apostrophe alone is considered an alternative. Authorities in British English specifically are overwhelmingly in favour of 's. I agree that one has, ultimately, to follow house rules, but if "Lord of the Rings" is considered to be an exception, should not "The War of the Worlds" also be so? It is, after all, the work of a British Writer, set in the United Kingdom and generally regarded as a commentary on the British Empire.Mabzilla (talk) 10:55, 19 June 2009 (UTC)

The MoS also says that if the article is stable in one version, it should remain in that version unless we take a strong national influence. I don't really feel comfortable debating that... I had a peek into the article history, and it seems that it has always been of mixed variation until the second half of 2008, when it was largely standardized to Wells', which suggests by WP:RETAIN that we should keep it there. I would personally like to see what User:Mesmacat has to say, as he was the main contributor to the current version. --Izno (talk) 16:27, 19 June 2009 (UTC)
Sry, been away from the wiki for a long time. I had a look at the punctuation style used by a number of well-respected scholars who have written on Wells, including Patrick Parrinder, who is a foremost expert in this field and 'Wells's' seems to be the standard usage. My inclination would be to follow their example. Mesmacat (talk) 12:36, 30 July 2009 (UTC)

Wells' views and characterization of religion are interesting. He clearly has no time for the rigidly fundamentalist view of things, personified in the Curate, who snapped under the pressure. But it is interesting that in some places, he makes a point of an encounter with 'God' in the quiet, dark silence (after the Curate's death), when he examines his own conscience. He also mentions praying with thanks to God after he realizes the martians have been destroyed. He also refers to bacteria being placed by God on the earth, 'in his wisdom'. But are these references to some kind of faith, or was Wells attempting to make the book more acceptable to the people of the day? I find it interesting that as wells mentions God placing bacteria on earth, he immediately discusses the evolutionary process which led to human resistence to germs. He also makes a point of the value of compassion. My own view is that Wells has room for a God who challenges people into new kinds of thinking. He has no time for a God of the rigid, narrow, fundamentalist type. Whether or not Wells had any kind of belief in a God is another question - CL —Preceding unsigned comment added by 203.48.59.60 (talk) 01:46, 13 August 2009 (UTC)

Cause of World War One[edit]

I know this may seem like a minor point, and not relevant to the article as a whole, but it's a bit of an assumption to say that European Empire building was the cause of the First World War, in Colonialism and imperialism. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.147.90.103 (talk) 10:10, 18 March 2010 (UTC)

Radio broadcast?[edit]

I'm sorry, but the radio broadcast has to be mentioned in this article, otherwise it looks stupid and incomplete. The Orson Welles broadcast is undeniably what most people associate with the novel, and while I'm not saying an entire section need be devoted to it, at the very least add a line referencing it, with a throw to the applicable section of the Adaptations article which most visitors won't think to look for under the links section at the very bottom of this thing. 68.146.64.9 (talk) 16:47, 1 December 2010 (UTC)

Given its age most people will know of the Spielburg film rather then a 80 year old radio broadcast.Slatersteven (talk) 16:51, 1 December 2010 (UTC)
Pure speculation that most people will know of the Spielberg film over the radio broadcast, let alone the classic-iconic original 1950's George Pal movie adaption of the novel. HammerFilmFan (talk) 23:41, 17 August 2012 (UTC)

EXACTLY! Why was it not mentioned that it scared hundreds/thousands of people in the 20th century over a radio broadcast? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.0.116.145 (talkcontribs) 01:15, 19 February 2011‎

I'm trying to forget about the Spielberg film. Optimus Sledge (talk) 23:59, 13 January 2013 (UTC)
The article now contains an "Adaptations" section. --McGeddon (talk) 13:46, 15 January 2013 (UTC)
I don't think hundreds/thousands of people were affected by this... but maybe? --The4DGovernment (talk) 20:31, 26 February 2014 (UTC)

Motivation for writing?[edit]

Can't recall where I read this, but supposedly Wells was fascinated by the Great Opposition of Mars that occurred on or about 1895. One story even has him travelling South, out of England, to observe it (Great Oppositions always occur with Mars being in a constellation South of the Celestial Equator), and then writing the story on his return to England. Old_Wombat (talk) 08:43, 19 October 2011 (UTC)

Initials[edit]

I notice that H.G. Wells's name is consistently being written as "Herbert George Wells". Surely that is very unusual? His name is always given as "H.G. Wells", shouldn't that be the standard? Even his Wikipedia article is called "H. G. Wells", not "Herbert George Wells". I would like to change it. Any objections?Captain Chaos (talk) 18:26, 29 June 2012 (UTC)

I agree, and have changed the article accordingly.--Mabzilla (talk) 12:11, 30 June 2012 (UTC)