Talk:Theosophy

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Philosophy[edit]

DO NOT Archive this section Check out http://www.iep.utm.edu/submit/100-most/ this is a Philosophy subject. Please do not edit the banner to remove these from Philosophy. JEMead (talk) 17:24, 29 December 2011 (UTC) This article has a lot more expansion to come. I set it to Start, not C. JEMead (talk) 21:43, 1 January 2012 (UTC) I expanded items and decided that a C might be ok here now.

Start talk page JEMead (talk) 08:57, 9 May 2012 (UTC)

Citation supplied[edit]

Hi there, I've supplied the "citation needed" under the heading "Overview of Blavatsky's teachings". It was the last citation under that heading, and is now numbered ref 31. I came across the relevant info in a scholarly course, Robert S Ellwood. After that I deleted the "citation needed" reference in the text. Hoping this is all cocher, as I am new to editing.Jyddcc (talk) 01:57, 26 February 2014 (UTC)Jyddcc Thanks! at least we have one from a decent source. Whether TPH is Kosher -- don't know. Ellwood is a good source though. JEMead (talk) 09:44, 26 February 2014 (UTC)

There Was No English Language in 2nd Century AD[edit]

Thus the statement that "The word esoteric dates back to the 2nd century CE" is misleading; and thus your source (if it actually says that) is not reliable. I came up with this etymology: "mid 17th cent.: from Greek esōterikos, from esōterō, comparative of esō ‘within,’ from es, eis ‘into.’" -- The great Liddell and Scott Greek Lexicon says, "ἐσωτερικός, ή, όν, inner, esoteric : ἐσωτερικά, τά, of certain Stoic doctrines, Gal.5.313 ; ἐ. μαθήματα Iamb.Comm.Math.18 ; of persons, -κοί, οἱ, the disciples of Pythagoras, Id.17.72 ; μέμνης. τὸν μὲν ἐ., τὸν δὲ ἐξ. καλεῖν (of Aristotle), Luc.Vit.Auct.26. (Prob. coined to correspond with ἐξωτερικός (q.v.).)" Thus, the statement should be changed to say "The English word esoteric is derived from the Greek word esōterikos, which is attested in ii AD in the writing of Galenus Medicus." Citation: A Greek-English Lexicon, 9th ed. (1940), p. 700. (EnochBethany (talk) 05:35, 28 March 2014 (UTC))

The word dates back to Lucian of Samosata in a dialogue between Zeus and Hermes selling Philosophers. It is an interesting story. I'll remove those changes. JEMead (talk)

Why do you remove the changes? Both Lucian and Galenus are 2nd century. Liddell and Scott is the best better authority here. (EnochBethany (talk) 13:44, 29 March 2014 (UTC))
The Greek word dates back to the 2nd century. I think we agree. The text states the "word" (Greek implied) dates back to the 2nd century. The English word may be different, but it is taken from Greek regardless, and from the 2nd century Greek. The text did not imply "the English word" in my mind. Perhaps we should say "the Greek word esoteric"  ?? That would make us both happy. Hannegraaff is the leading (or a famous leading) modern expert on Esotericism and Theosophy, I used his wording. Hence - it can not be techniquely wrong as he states the Greek reference and refers to the word esoteric as dating to the 2nd century. He also implied Greek not English as I did. We are arguing a minute matter here. 96.247.159.191 (talk) 16:40, 29 March 2014 (UTC) Note - edits were mine JEMead (talk) 17:28, 29 March 2014 (UTC)

Divine is An Adjective; Theos = God, not "divine"[edit]

It is simply a fact that "divine" is an adjective. Like "the divine apple tasted good." Of course adjectives are sometimes substantivalized into nouns, like when some ecclesiastical figure is called "a divine." But theos in theomorphic names means, God, not "divine." I have re-corrected the reversion. I have added a citation from the standard Greek-English lexicon, that theos = God. (EnochBethany (talk) 13:50, 29 March 2014 (UTC))

Divine is a common noun and is listed as such, as well as the substantive form. It is also a verb. In Theosophy, we use the word Divine because of the possibility of "many" gods as divine and the synonym God is a bit off. The modern Academy all (to my knowledge) translate it as the noun "Divine." This is the modern academic use/translation. Divine fits better. I am not sure who the Greeks thought God was (which one?). Divine avoids confusion and is also a good and common synonym for God. (Merriam Webster lists it as a noun and also a synonym for God as well. 96.247.159.191 (talk) 16:49, 29 March 2014 (UTC) Note - edits were mine (from 96.247.159.191) JEMead (talk) 17:29, 29 March 2014 (UTC)