Talk:Thermal energy storage

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Delete Economics Section?[edit]

The 'Economics' section has several overgeneralisations (possibly from a US-centric view of the world) such as the peak occuring in summer, and being met by gas turbines. It is also not clear how it relates to the rest of the article, as it does not mention storage at all. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 65.207.11.228 (talk) 00:51, 25 January 2011 (UTC)

Needs updating[edit]

This page needs updating to reflect developments since 2008. It still says molten salt is "proposed" and "can" be used as storage for solar thermal plants. But molten salt is now used operationally for this purpose in Andasol 1 & 2 —Preceding unsigned comment added by Jondoig (talkcontribs) 02:30, 7 March 2010 (UTC)

There are a fair number of articles on related subjects. IMO this article should be integrated with what is out there, and serve as a (better categorized than currently) index to specific applications of heat storage. It could be a thin index simply linking to relevant sections of other articles, or alternatively those articles could seek to use this article as a way to offload details. Trying to keep this article up to date when its scope/role is unclear will be more effort than if it is integrated first. In the meantime, though, I suppose there is no harm in dumping news/research articles in the Talk page for future use, and this seems like the place to do it, so here's a recent one: Azobenzene-Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes As High-Energy Density Solar Thermal Fuels: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nl201357n — Preceding unsigned comment added by 140.232.0.70 (talk) 16:37, 14 July 2011 (UTC)

US-Centric Bias[edit]

This article appears to have been written for specific climates of the USA, and for specific types of building within the USA. It assumes that thermal stores are primarily used for daytime cooling in A/C systems. It describes systems used in the USA as if they are applicable globally. It should state which information applies only the USA, and what building types it applies to.

To improve the article, it could also cover other parts of the world, and other systems of thermal storage.

For instance, in most of Northern Europe and Canada, thermal stores are primarily used for heating, not cooling; and the national grids operate in different ways. Most European buildings have no A/C system, and rely only on space heating for the air temperature regulation.

In Africa and the Middle East where daytime cooling is reqired, the thermal store is normally provided by the heavyweight construction of the house walls and roofs, and there is often no A/C plant or electric grid.

Bards 06:29, 14 February 2007 (UTC)

Possible issue with Molten salt technology[edit]

Potassium nitrate decomposes at 400 °C (752 °F). If the NaNO3 / KNO3 mixture is heated to 566 °C (1,051 °F), I would think that there would be a problem. Jim1138 (talk) 04:54, 13 September 2008 (UTC)

Decomposition is the limiting factor for the 1050°F maximum temperature of a solar salt system (60%NaNO3 / 40% KNO3). The decomposition temperature of the mixture is perhaps higher than of the pottassium nitrate alone or the decomposition is still slow enough due to the kinetics of the reaction. Using a pressurized oxygen cover gas allows to push the maximum temperature even a little bit higher.Lars9e (talk) 06:47, 3 October 2008 (UTC)

Molten salt technology example erroneous[edit]

Looks like that the number stated for the example 100MW power for 4 hours is 1 decimal too large. Calculations yield ca 10MW if a temperature range of 288-540 degC is applied . Would it make sense to speak about theoretical energy content, because, at present, neither steam turbine, nor mechanical/electrical conversion efficiencies are provided. My understanding would be that readers would benefit from an example which allows comparison with other power generation systems. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Peter Breithaupt (talkcontribs) 09:39, 10 October 2011 (UTC)

Is There any Thermal Storage System For Household Purposes[edit]

Is it possible to use any Thermal Storage System for household purposes. For Ex. I Can store the heat from Solar Heaters. and the next Day use the heat to cook food in the morning. before sunrise??. These type of applications has not been discussed in the present article — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ap aravind (talkcontribs) 14:13, 23 June 2011 (UTC)

An example of home use would be storage tanks on solar hot water systems. Also there is Glauber's_salt solutions and Trombe walls for space heating purposes. I have not so far heard of a product designed to work at cooking temperatures. The article could use a well integrated link to Passive_solar_building_design#Heat_storage and some of the other "See Also" articles would be better worked into the text. (140.232.0.70 (talk) 16:26, 14 July 2011 (UTC))

Heat storage in solid media[edit]

Apparently, there is a misunderstood with the given example for the solid media storage. Actually there is no concrete storage in the Friedrichshafen district, it is only the water tanks which are in concrete. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2001:878:200:1052:35CF:1286:F7D2:341 (talk) 21:08, 30 November 2012 (UTC)