Talk:Three Sisters (Australia)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Australia / New South Wales  (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon Three Sisters (Australia) is within the scope of WikiProject Australia, which aims to improve Wikipedia's coverage of Australia and Australia-related topics. If you would like to participate, visit the project page.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject New South Wales.
 
Note icon
Need help improving this article? Ask a LibrarianWhat's this? at the National Library of Australia, or the State Library of New South Wales.

Should we have two different photos or should one be deleted? (Jasabella)

No harm in having two, although there's not really enough text at the moment to need them. What we could really do with is more text about the sisters. By the way, you can sign your name by typing four tildes, like this: ~~~~. That automatically puts your name and the date, like this: Worldtraveller 15:21, 15 May 2005 (UTC)
Hmmm... should we upload them to commons and create a gallery? - Ta bu shi da yu 09:27, 5 January 2006 (UTC)

Isn't a harder capstone layer reponsible for the comparable erosion resistance of these pinnacles? --Wetman 04:56, 20 April 2006 (UTC)

Aboriginal legend[edit]

Wouldn't it be good to have the real Aboriginal legend on this page? Since it is already mentioned that the told story here is not Aboriginal.

Unfortunately, I don't remember the whole story. It was something about an Aboriginal medicine man and his three daughters who lived in the mountains. And there was the bunyip that frightened them all. That's why the medicine man always told his girls to hide in the mountains when he went away. One day when he was gone and the girls hid again, a frightening animal came up to them and one of the girls threw a stone after it. Then after a short time of silence all the animals ran away, because the stone awakened the bunyip that was very angry to be disturbed in his sleep. When the medicine man saw that his daughters were in danger, he turned them into rocks, so they would be safe for the moment. He wanted to turn them back after the danger was gone. But the bunyip got even angrier when he realized that somebody interfered and so he chased the medicine man. But on his escape, the medicine man got buried under a stone which fell onto him and so he was forced to turn himself into a bird. This way he could escape the bunyip, but alas he lost his magic bone, so he can't turn the girls back into their human form. And so he's looking for his bone until this day and the three sisters wait for him to turn them back. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 58.105.94.146 (talk) 10:05, 8 December 2007 (UTC)

Renaming disambiguation page[edit]

Please note that there has been a proposal to make the default for "Three Sisters" the Chekhov play rather than the disambiguation page. Please refer here to express your view. Somno (talk) 03:19, 29 July 2008 (UTC)

You reall need to add more information[edit]

We really need to add more information to this article chrissy =) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 122.107.249.150 (talk) 06:10, 25 September 2008 (UTC)

legend[edit]

Long ago in the Blue Mountains, three Aboriginal sisters; Meenhi, Wimlah and Gunnedoo lived with their father, a Witch doctor named Tyawan.

Only one creature was feared by all - he was the Bunyip. Tyawan who knew where he lived would leave his daughters on the cliff behind a rocky wall where they would be safe while he would collect food.

One day, waving goodbye to his daughters he descended the cliff steps. On the top of the cliff, a big centipede suddenly appeared and frightened Meenhi. She picked up a stone and threw it at him. The stone rolled away over the cliff and crashed into the valley below. The rocks behind the three sisters split open, leaving the sisters on a thin ledge.

There was a deep rumble from below and the angry Bunyip emerged from his sleep. He looked up to see who had rudely awakened him and there perched on the thin ledge he saw the sisters cowering in fear. Furiously he lurched towards them.

In the valley, Tyawan heard the cry and looked up to see that the Bunyip had almost reached his daughters. Frantically the Witch Doctor pointed his magic bone at the girls and turned them into stone. They would be safe there until the Bunyip was gone and then Tyawan would return them to their former selves.

The Bunyip was even more angry when he saw what had happened and he turned on Tyawan and began to chase him. Running away, Tyawan found himself trapped against a rock which he culd neither climb nor go around. He quickly changed into a Lyrebird and disappeared into a small cave. Everyone was safe but Tyawan had dropped his magic bone. The Bunyip returned angrily to his hole.

Tyawan crept out of the cave and searched for the bone, still seeking it today while the Three Sisters stand silently waiting, hoping he will find the bone and turn them back to their former selves.

We can see the Three Sisters today from Echo Point and in the valley we can hear Tyawan, the Lyrebird, calling them as he searches for his lost magic bone. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 90.203.144.7 (talk) 18:52, 2 March 2010 (UTC)

File:Three Sisters Sunset.jpg to appear as POTD soon[edit]

Hello! This is a note to let the editors of this article know that File:Three Sisters Sunset.jpg will be appearing as picture of the day on December 13, 2011. You can view and edit the POTD blurb at Template:POTD/2011-12-13. If this article needs any attention or maintenance, it would be preferable if that could be done before its appearance on the Main Page so Wikipedia doesn't look bad. :) Thanks! howcheng {chat} 19:53, 12 December 2011 (UTC)

Picture of the day
Three Sisters, Australia

The Three Sisters is a sandstone rock formation in the Blue Mountains of New South Wales, Australia, near the town of Katoomba. It is a popular bushwalking destination and visitors may descend from the Three Sisters down into the Jamison Valley via a series of 800 steel and stone steps.

Photo: JJ Harrison
ArchiveMore featured pictures...