Talk:Thursday Next

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Untitled[edit]

The Shakespeare Division (SO-29) broke away from SO-27 to deal solely with Baconian uprisings and Marlowe fans, among other Shakespearean disturbances.

I think this belongs in an article about SpecOps or SO-29, not Thursday Next herself. --66.216.68.28 19:21, 13 Jun 2005 (UTC)

Colonel Next[edit]

I propose the following expansion of the information concerning Thursday's father:

Her father Colonel Next is a rogue member of the Chronoguard, or time police, and does not officially exist, having been erased by his former bosses (using the simple but effective method of a timely knock on the door just before his conception). He does, however, remain at large throughout the time-space continuum, and still frequently finds time to visit Thursday, usually by stopping time around her so they can talk without her father being arrested by the Chronoguard. Colonel Next has no first name, a consequence of his erasure.

EDIT: Since nobody seems to object, I've done it.

Key difference[edit]

In Something Rotten, Thursday's father asks her about Winston Churchill. As far as she's concerned, Churchill is a minor politician who was killed in a traffic accident in New York in 1932. Presumably this is the key difference: Churchill did have such an accident but survived it.

--GwydionM 17:15, 8 July 2006 (UTC)

If by "key difference" you mean what makes the history of Thursday's world different from ours, then the Crimean War has already being going for about 80 years by this point. Daibhid C 20:12, 24 October 2006 (UTC)

Indeed, the split in temporal reality between their world and ours was at least two hundred years before the present day. Crazynas t 23:04, 24 October 2006 (UTC)

In any case, the technical term is "point of divergence". samwaltz 02:13, 29 October 2007 (UTC)

George Formby[edit]

In book two, George Formby is described as having become president-for-life but had been assassinated (intro to chapter 27). In book four, the same block of text appears but radically altered, and his assassination is not mentioned (ironically, also intro to chapter 27). The implication is that Formby was already dead by the time Lost in a Good Book takes place, but that the past had been altered sometime in between then and Something Rotten. England is a republic, sure, but Formby isn't necessarily president. Kimpire 14:32, 9 November 2006 (UTC)

The change in the reference to his assassination probably reflects the events of Something Rotten (i.e., chapter 27)--he's clearly president in that book. The reference to his assassination in book 2 doesn't mean he was dead at the time of the book's events; Fforde has said on his website that he considers the books to be written in a state of deep introspection much later in Thursday's life, and many of the headers are from works that must have been written later (deFloss's works and Thursday's own memoirs). Since there's no date given for the book on Formby, the likeliest explanation is that the change refers to Something Rotten, not a shift between books. (Formby is described as "non-executive president-for-life," BTW; it's not entirely clear what that means, but he seems to have some ability to block legislation.) (Note that time travel is involved in the events of SR--Thursday uses a weapon she left for herself in the time-travel sequence in the first book--so the original reference to his assassination probably reflect the pre-time travel reality.) Strephon 21:51, 28 December 2006 (UTC)

Extra-narration activity[edit]

I just finished The Eyre Affair. I think the extra-narrative activity is worthy of mention, and was wondering if it occurred in other words.

  • Section where bookworms are excreting punctuation and capital letters are explicitly shown in dialogue.
  • Note at the front of the book: The typography and binding of this book conform to accepted Goliath Corporation standards Goliath(c) For all you'll ever need. (tm) warning: Misuse of the Goliath Corporation's products or services may interfere with you and your familiy's continued rights to health, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
  • Adverts at the end of the book for "Pete and Dave's Dodo Emporium" and "Toast".

Is there anything else you've seen? samwaltz 02:12, 29 October 2007 (UTC)

They don't relate to the character of Thursday Next though. If the title of this article was called Thursday Next (series)... 78.146.173.31 (talk) 13:57, 3 September 2010 (UTC)

Newbie comment[edit]

In "Eyre," it is the "People's Republic of Wales" -- does that change, or is that a slip of the keyboard in the text? (treethinker, not logged in) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.30.204.235 (talk) 04:28, 26 January 2009 (UTC)

Death of Thursday[edit]

Shouldn't we include it? And where should we put it? 78.146.173.31 (talk) 13:55, 3 September 2010 (UTC)

Thursday Next name[edit]

Not sure if this has been asked of the author and confirmed or refuted, but "Thursday next" appears several times emphasized in Romeo and Juliet (at least twice if not three times? - Act 3 Scene 5, Act 4 Scene 1). The name is explained well enough in the novels, but this seems a possible (... hrm. Unlikely?) inspiration for it? Schissel | Sound the Note! 01:52, 10 September 2012 (UTC)