Talk:Thyme

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'kay so let's discuss where this should link[edit]

A search for 'thyme' should hit the 'thymus vulgaricus' page, as the interwiki links attest. Dunno how you handle this kinda thing but whatevs, needs to be fixed, a search for 'thyme' obviously should hit the culinary herb. I'll do what I choose regarding redirects and new articles in a bit if some more competent wikipedian doesn't precede me. Thanks for your attention in this matter. <3 Excalibre (talk) 04:06, 5 October 2011 (UTC)

Picture[edit]

Looks nothing like thyme. In fact, this photo looks like mint. I assume whoever put it up has no knowledge of what thyme is. I will take a picture of my plant and put it up tomorrow.

Is this a typo?[edit]

Thyme is common in West Indian Cuisine? Does this mean Native American, or should this be East Indian? I don't think East Indian has been very common parlance since the British Empire. Should it just be Indian Cuisine?

West Indian as in Carribean, eg Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago jimfbleak 04:40, 25 Jun 2004 (UTC)

History section[edit]

The history section should have the header "A Brief History of Thyme". A little joke for the reader :-)

Good one
Stephen Hall King ;)

SHysterical.gif. But what the history section does need is some references to support the info claimed. Anyone got some details?? - MPF 12:39, 29 July 2006 (UTC)

It seems to be a not-word-for-word of the History section at [1] <this website, which cites several actual book sources at the bottom of it's page. And I'd just like to add that I am totally in favor of the header "A Brief History of Thyme". :D - A.J. 04:37, 18 November 2006 (UTC)
That ext link is a rather biased commercial one, not really suitable for wiki, so I reverted it. Best to find something neutral. There's some of the info is in Huxley which I'll add as a cite, but not every detail that we have claimed. - MPF 15:01, 18 November 2006 (UTC)

Thyme has been on earth for many many years and it is still here, so people use it as a herb that hey add to meat.

I just saw the joke and was going to mention it if nobody else did. Good one. ;-) --Cuervo, not logged in @ 76.212.161.251 03:21, 2 July 2007 (UTC)

I, too, arrived here solely to offer my kudos for the Brief history of thyme header. Funny yet appropriate; Bravo! --Kaz 01:02, 11 July 2007 (UTC)

Thymol in thyme[edit]

Just one small addendum which I would like to see: most (if not all) varieties of thyme (known to me) contain the (phenolic) compound thymol. It is a mild antiseptic. Here in the UK, we have a toothpaste called "Euthymol" (from the Greek word for "good", plus "thymol"), which is pink and distinctly thyme-flavoured. ("Euthymol" is a proprietary name, in this context.)

Hair Commodore 21:05, 27 October 2006 (UTC)

In the United States we have Listerine that once "killed the germs that cause bad breath...” with thymol as an active ingredient.

DOES THYME KILL E.COLI, B. SUBTILIS, or s. EPIDERMIDIS?

_______ I was wondering why isn't any medicinal use in this page. It is a greatly used in Europe for cough and phlegm in the form of syrup and teas.

Suggested references[edit]

Here are some possible articles related to medicinal aspects.

Popular press: Block, Betsy. "Thyme: this herb is believed to fight infection, soothe sore muscles, relieve coughs, and settle upset stomachs." Natural Health 29.6 (July-August 1999): 36(1).

Medical research that "Thyme extract had relaxing effects on organs possessing β2-receptors (uterus and trachea)." (in rats): Wienkötter, N.; F. Begrow, U. Kinzinger, D. Schierstedt, E.J. Verspohl (2007). "The Effect of Thyme Extract on β2-Receptors and Mucociliary Clearance". Planta Medica (7): 629–635. doi:10.1055/s-2007-981535.  Jodi.a.schneider (talk) 02:04, 11 February 2008 (UTC) Brown's English-Telugu dictionary says that THYME is like `MARUVAM' a fragrant ground-sticking plant, used for adorning women's hair and in garlands for deities. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.203.196.144 (talk) 02:33, 4 February 2013 (UTC)

Lemon thyme[edit]

Shouldn't lemon thyme be mentioned in the article? Badagnani 17:56, 15 December 2006 (UTC)

Seems to be a lot missing[edit]

Okay, I've got some thyme. What do I do with it? What is (are) the basic prep(s)? Remove stems? How to adjust quantity when recipe calls for fresh and you've only got dried? What foods (e.g. lamb) are particularly yummy with it? How do you store it?

Thyme is a cooking ingredient. Most readers will be interested in it as that.
Dmforcier 02:33, 3 May 2007 (UTC)

Pls do not redirect the page from Thyme to Thymus vulgaris, or vice versa[edit]

The former is genus and the later a specy..... —Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.62.138.32 (talk) 05:14, 10 November 2007 (UTC)

Thyme could also mean expert or philosopher.

Rarely fresh[edit]

The text suggested that where otherwise not specified in recipes, assume that fresh thyme is intended. While it certainly doesn't hurt (fresh thyme versus dried thyme is less dissimilar in taste than fresh versus dried garlic, and generally just has a rounder and less woody taste), but it is in fact the opposite: usually recipes use "thyme" as a short hand for "ground thyme", ie, the opposite of fresh. I hate to change it, because the advice is right, but the truth is different. --173.66.61.78 (talk) 17:40, 10 July 2011 (UTC)

You have a point, but I think your origins are showing. I've never used ground thyme, I don't know anybody who does, and most recipes I see mention thyme that is dried, but not ground. And most recipes I know mention whether it's fresh or dried. That makes sense, because the quantities are different. Groogle (talk) 04:31, 3 April 2012 (UTC)

'This article is about leaves and oils of the thyme plant'[edit]

As 'leaves and oils of the thyme plant" are part of the thyme plant, and should be merged with Thymus. Thyme is a herb, not a spice, and the parts used as such are not sufficiently distinguished from the plant (consider trade names, or preparation before parts can be used a a herb or spice; compare with others such as saffron and bay, and other herbs like oregano, and coriander roots, seed and leaves aka cilantro). For specific chemicals or preparations consider new articles such as 'Thyme oil'; otherwise this artilcle should best be treated as a section under Thymus, or under the species of that genus. 'Thyme' as an article separate from Thymus is not justified. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 121.210.161.120 (talk) 13:12, 11 June 2012 (UTC)

'menstrual cramps'[edit]

I found the following article about how thyme oil can relieve women from the pains from menstrual cramps: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3992233/ It could fit right under the part where it is suggested Thyme oil could help against acne