Talk:Thyroid hormone resistance

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edit·history·watch·refresh Stock post message.svg To-do list for Thyroid hormone resistance:

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Types of resistance[edit]

  • Seems there are at least 3 distinct types that deserve mention. General, central, and peripheral, best layman's terms link I've found so far: http://www.drlowe.com/QandA/askdrlowe/resistnc.htm Most other sources tend to focus on general, often briefly discussing central, but rarely doing anything other than barely mentioning peripheral.
  • The types of thyroid resistance are mentioned here as well.

Case Report on types of Thyroid resistance and in these books. The peripheral one in which the whole body except for the pituitary is resistant seems to be the rarest one. A patient like that would require large amounts of thyroxine and he would be normal when his tests showed him to be hyperthyroid but he would suffer no ill effects due to his resistance. Thus his TSH would be suppresed but his t4,t3 high.

  • Fibromyalgia and Chronic Myofascial Pain: A Survival Manual (2nd Edition)

by Devin J. Starlanyl

  • Diagnosis and Management of Pituitary Disorders (Contemporary Endocrinology)

by Brooke Swearingen

  • Medical Management of Thyroid Disease (Clinical Guides to Medical Management)

by David S. Cooper

January 2008 edits[edit]

Recent major additions with this edit. Quick search on PubMed suggests 363 possible relevant articles for "Thyroid hormone resistance" and I do not see majority being authored by just the 3 researchers listed in this edit. So here follows some points to working on the new additions:

  • Material needs to be WP:Cited from WP:Reliable sources to WP:Verify, else liable for deletion. Responsibility lies with editors adding the material - so such bold (aka wild) claims as this cause of fibromyalgia or CFS needs bery strong evidence if not to be seen as fringe theory of a trivial minority and ripe from pruning as per WP:NPOV's WP:UNDUE.
  • "This shocks doctors who do not understand thyroid hormone resistance." is typical phrasing of mavericks, idealists and others who are perceived (rightly or wrongly) as pseudoscientific in their conclusions. If all other doctors think differently then, for time being, theory is de facto a trivial minority ?
  • The ICD10 code is given as E07, but http://www.who.int/classifications/apps/icd/icd10online/?ge00.htm+e07 does not (to my reading of it) include this, should it be E07.8 or E07.9 ?
  • The article is describing I think 2 groups, the rare and specific Genentic Mutation, and some softer milder phenotype giving rises to borderline subclinical disease. The former is well verified by research, indeed see PMID 17574009 by Refetoff et al (?is this the same doctor as Dr. Refetoof in the edit I'm discussing, if so then clearly either 70.224.138.35 (talk · contribs) or PubMed can't spell and with over 300 hits on PubMed I suspect the former.
  • PubMed gives no hits for "Refetoff fibromyalgia" or "Refetoff fatigue".
  • PubMed "Lowe JC, thyroid" gives just 2 hits, which seems at odds with "Dr. Lowe believes through extensive research, that fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome are frequently misdiagnoses of partial resistance to thyroid hormone". Of the 2 hits, PMID 9076694 is a hypothesis and the other, PMID 16810133, found "TSH, FT4, and FT3 levels did not correlate with RMRs (Reduced Metabolic rate) in either group" which hardly is a ringing endorsement of the theory
  • As for D Wilson, PubMed zero hits for "Wilson D thyroid resistance", so which papers might confirm his views ?
  • "environmental toxicities, stealth viruses, mutated bacteria, systemic fugal" seems a frequent Google hit for pages discussing Lyme Disease

So as a first stage, I'm going to revert, then reinsert newly added material into its own section suitably tagged re POV, uncited and verification. Even then, quite disproprotionately long essay as per WP:WEIGHT David Ruben Talk 02:44, 10 January 2008 (UTC)