Talk:Tilting at windmills

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Linguistics (Rated Stub-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Linguistics, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Linguistics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Comment[edit]

This is great... I hope Wikipedia will keep up with introductions idioms and their sources. Thanks.

Repetitive[edit]

This paragraph is repetitive and reads poorly: The phrase originated in the novel Don Quixote, by Miguel de Cervantes. The phrase is sometimes used to describe confrontations where adversaries are incorrectly perceived. The phrase is sometimes used to describe courses of action that are based on misinterpreted or misapplied heroic, romantic, or idealistic justifications. I propose changing it to: "The phrase originated in the novel Don Quixote, by Miguel de Cervantes. It is sometimes used to describe confrontations where adversaries are incorrectly perceived or courses of action that are based on misinterpreted or misapplied heroic, romantic, or idealistic justifications." —Preceding unsigned comment added by 65.24.82.223 (talk) 21:26, 20 October 2009 (UTC)

Book quote[edit]

Although Cervantes' book is clearly long out of copyright, the English translation used here may or may not be. At the very least, credit should be given to cite which translation (and translator) is being used. WikiDan61ChatMe!ReadMe!! 13:13, 24 January 2014 (UTC)

"importune"[edit]

In the second paragraph of the introduction to the article, the word "importune" appears, used as an adjective. I cannot find a dictionary that describes the word as an adjective; it is only ever described as a verb, "to importune". I suspect that the sentence in which it appears here, "It may also connote ... for a vain goal", is lifted straight from The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms, as per footnote #1, and may be a misquote, because "importunate" would be the correct word in this context. Does anyone have access to this dictionary to check it? The preceding sentence reads a little weirdly as well, so I am wondering whether this has been lifted from that dictionary as well. --P123cat1 (talk) 22:46, 31 March 2014 (UTC)