Talk:Timeline of Mars Science Laboratory

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Speculation[edit]

Deleted speculation on organics finding. NASA Plays Down Mars Speculation BatteryIncluded (talk) 15:23, 30 November 2012 (UTC)

media hype and the exact organics[edit]

[pp1] It was planned to use a fine grained sand most likely a dune to to clean out contamination from the sample scoop and the inlet system of Chemin and SAM. Rocknest was chosen to be this sand. X Scoops were taken and discarged. the following Y scoopes were analyses by the two rover internal instruments Chemnmin and SAM.

[pp2] On October 17, 2012 at Rocknest, the first X-ray diffraction analysis of Martian soil was performed. The results revealed the presence of several minerals, including feldspar, pyroxenes and olivine, and suggested that the Martian soil in the sample was similar to the weathered basaltic soils of Hawaiian volcanoes. The sample used is composed of dust distributed from global dust storms and local fine sand. So far, the materials Curiosity has analyzed are consistent with the initial ideas of deposits in Gale Crater recording a transition through time form a wet to dry environment.[78]

[pp3] In the following days 3 measurements with the SAM instrument were done. The relative complex nature of the instrument and data analysis delayed the publication of first results in the weekly press conferences. Rumors were fueled by an interview of the project scientist John Grotzinger and later by an interview of the director of JPL Charles Elachi.

[pp4] On November 22, 2012, the Curiosity rover analyzed a rock named "Rocknest 3" with the APXS and then resumed traveling toward "Point Lake" overlook on its way to Glenelg Intrique. On December 3, 2012, NASA reported that Curiosity performed its first extensive soil analysis, revealing the presence of water molecules, sulfur and chlorine in the Martian soil. The presence of perchlorates in the sample seems highly likely also the presence of sulfate and sulfide is likely because sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide were detected. Small amounts of chloromethane dichloromethane and trichloromethane have been found. The source of the carbon in the mentioned molecules is unclear until now. Contamination of the instrument, organics in the sample and inorganic carbon like carbonates could be possible sources.

Should we change it to more like that?

--Stone (talk) 09:02, 6 December 2012 (UTC)

OK - added last sentences of noted [pp4] above to article (w/ some mods and wls & refs adds) re exact organics detected as follows =>
Copied from => Timeline of Mars Science Laboratory#Glenelg terrain
On December 3, 2012, NASA reported that Curiosity performed its first extensive soil analysis, revealing the presence of water molecules, sulfur and chlorine in the Martian soil.[1][2] The presence of perchlorates in the sample seems highly likely; the presence of sulfate and sulfide is also likely because sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide were detected. Small amounts of chloromethane, dichloromethane and trichloromethane were detected. The source of the carbon in these molecules is unclear. Possible sources include contamination of the instrument, organics in the sample and inorganic carbonates.[1][2]
ok to rv/mv/ce of course - [pp2] seems the same as present? - flexible re [pp1] & [pp3] - open to further discussion? - in any case - Enjoy! :) Drbogdan (talk) 18:03, 6 December 2012 (UTC)

Exploring Martian Habitability in Science[edit]

FWIW - special issue of Science (journal) (January 24, 2014) about "Exploring Martian Habitability" has been published - see => < ref name="SCI-20140124special">Various (January 24, 2014). "Special Issue - Table of Contents - Exploring Martian Habitability". Science 343 (6169): 345–452. Retrieved January 24, 2014. </ref> and/or < ref name="SCI-20140124">Various (January 24, 2014). "Special Collection - Curiosity - Exploring Martian Habitability". Science. Retrieved January 24, 2014. </ref> - in any case - Enjoy! :) Drbogdan (talk) 11:25, 24 January 2014 (UTC)

As expected, the information harvest will be massive. We could actually start a new article about the missions findings, as was done with the MER mission: Scientific information from the Mars Exploration Rover mission. --BatteryIncluded (talk) 12:59, 24 January 2014 (UTC)

Spectral Analysis (SAM)[edit]

One EGA-plot is labeled as "Spectral Analysis (SAM)". Most people working with that type of plots avoid the spectrum word and use th word plot to avoid the question on "Where is the wavelength axis?" --Stone (talk) 20:06, 27 April 2014 (UTC)

  1. ^ a b Brown, Dwayne; Webster, Guy; Jones, Nancy Neal (December 3, 3012). "NASA Mars Rover Fully Analyzes First Martian Soil Samples". NASA. Retrieved December 3, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Chang, Ken (December 3, 2012). "Mars Rover Discovery Revealed". New York Times. Retrieved December 3, 2012.