Talk:Toba catastrophe theory

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Neandertals[edit]

As the Neandertals were around at the time of the Toba eruption is there any information about what happened to them? Mostly apparently living in Europe, did the eruption also affect their numbers as well?AT Kunene (talk) 17:14, 8 March 2012 (UTC)


There is an incomplete citation in the text: "Green 2007." Would someone familiar with this subject please determine whether the following reference and abstract are the information intended to be cited there?


Richard E. Green, Johannes Krause, Susan E. Ptak, Adrian W. Briggs, Michael T. Ronan, Jan F. Simons, Lei Du, Michael Egholm, Jonathan M. Rothberg, Maja Paunovic & Svante Pääbo Analysis of one million base pairs of Neanderthal DNA Nature 444, 330-336 (16 November 2006)

| doi:10.1038/nature05336; Received 14 July 2006; Accepted 11 October 2006

Richard E. Green, Johannes Krause, Susan E. Ptak, Adrian W. Briggs, and Svante Pääbo were affiliated with Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany

Michael T. Ronan, Jan F. Simons, Lei Du, Michael Egholm, and Jonathan M. Rothberg were affiliated with 454 Life Sciences, 20 Commercial Street, Branford, Connecticut 06405, USA

Maja Paunovic was affiliated with Institute of Quaternary Paleontology and Geology, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, A. Kovacica 5/II, HR-10 000 Zagreb, Croatia, but is deceased.

Address correspondence to: Richard E. Green. Neanderthal fossil extract sequences were deposited at EBI with accession numbers CAAN01000001–CAAN01369630. Correspondence and requests for materials should be addressed to R.E.G. (Email: green@eva.mpg.de).

Abstract [re-written for copyright compliance; please check against the original in Google Scholar] Among extinct hominids, Neanderthals are the closest to modern humans. Comparing their genome to modern ones helps identify genes specific to humans having fully modern anatomy. This work concerns one Neanderthal fossil, 38,000 years old, that appears not to be contaminated with modern human DNA. Comparing sequences containing more than one million base pairs of hominoid nuclear DNA (obtained by direct high-throughput sequencing) to modern human DNA suggests that modern human DNA sequences diverged from those of Neanderthals ca. 500,000 years ago. Using present technology and the fossils available, an effort to sequence a Neanderthal genome can begin. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Nhy67ygv (talkcontribs) 04:20, 26 May 2012 (UTC)

Confusing citations[edit]

Some of the citations are unclear. In the second paragraph of 'Volcanic winter and cooling' there is the sentence: "In contrast, Oppenheimer believes that estimates of a drop in surface temperature by 3–5 °C are probably too high, and he suggests that temperatures dropped only by 1 °C." His first name is not given, and the reference is Oppenheimer 2002. Another reference is Openheimer 2001, but this is almost certainly the same book judging by the page numbers.. The citations (which are not in alphabetical order) refer to Stephen and Clive Oppenheimer, but none of them is dated 2001 or 2002. Which Oppenheimer and which work is being cited? Dudley Miles (talk) 21:51, 5 January 2013 (UTC)

I have now found and added the missing reference and put them in alphabetical order. Dudley Miles (talk) 18:40, 10 January 2013 (UTC)

Article split[edit]

After reading this article its seems clear there are 2 topics going on here. One being the supereruption that according to the text here is not disputed - then we have the bottleneck theory portion of the article. Should these not be divided - one as a geological event that has happened - and the other the event related to the conjectured aftermath bottleneck theory. I came to this article to find info on the Toba supereruption (a geological event) - not the human aftermath that should in my opinion be separated. What do others think?Moxy (talk) 17:19, 24 January 2013 (UTC)

I completely agree. An separate article on the event could easily link to the "theory" or vice versa (but see below) PeterDz (talk) 14:51, 29 April 2013 (UTC)PeterDz

Hypothesis or Theory?[edit]

At different points in the article what may or may not have happened to the human race as a result of the Toba event is described as both a theory and as a hypothesis. It is either one or the other, but NOT both. My personal understanding is that the impact is conjectural, with little evidence one way or the other and a great deal of disagreement in the field, but I am not an expert on the subject. Could an expert please correct, choosing one. Or is that itself too controversial? PeterDz (talk) 14:46, 29 April 2013 (UTC)PeterDz

Hypothesis is the correct word - hopefully I'll get around to changing it. Maybe now, we have Pole shift hypothesis. Dougweller (talk) 15:38, 29 April 2013 (UTC)
Ah, saw your post about splitting the article. That might have to be done first. More thought needed. Dougweller (talk) 15:39, 29 April 2013 (UTC)
Oxford team "puts a nail in the coffin of the disaster-catastrophe theory": Toba super-volcano catastrophe idea 'dismissed' Jyg (talk) 06:16, 1 May 2013 (UTC)

One paper does not negate the theory[edit]

We have to be careful here - although I agree that in recent years the theory has been under the microscope - we cant change the whole tone of the article because of the conclusion of one paper dealing with East Africa.Moxy (talk) 14:57, 9 June 2013 (UTC)