Talk:Tooth

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Describe the Pattern of Teeth in Mouth[edit]

incisors, canines, pre-molars, molars, which are "cheek teeth" anatomy of tooth, gums, circulatory system and nervous system in mouth/teeth tooth/mouth conditions and problems — Preceding unsigned comment added by 152.3.68.15 (talk) 01:07, 27 September 2012 (UTC)

Where's birds?[edit]

Birds can have teeth too...--72.197.35.238 (talk) 19:04, 13 June 2011 (UTC)

Er no...they don't. Maybe you're thinking about the egg tooth? - M0rphzone (talk) 02:13, 2 April 2012 (UTC)

Teeth have emaeml the hardest subtance in the body — Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.119.39.142 (talk) 01:33, 9 February 2012 (UTC)

Grammar thing[edit]

Tooth (plural teeth) are small, calcified, whitish structures found in the jaws Clearly this should be changed to "A tooth is a small, calcified, whitish structure. . . " because, it's you know, singular.

More grammar[edit]

“Early fish such as the thelodonts had teeth for scales, suggesting that the origin of teeth was scales which were retained in the mouth.” - scales for teeth perhaps? Anihl (talk) 01:47, 27 February 2013 (UTC)

It's closer to accurate as is - early scales were heavily ossified, with dentine at the main support and a layer of almost-but-not-quite enamel. A subset of these were modified to become teeth. It's pretty poorly phrases as it is. I'll give it a quick edit, see if I cant improve it. HCA (talk) 16:28, 27 February 2013 (UTC)

Canines: In dogs, the teeth are less likely than humans to form dental cavities because of the very high pH of dog saliva, which prevents enamel from demineralizing[edit]

This seems inaccurate, despite it supposedly being sourced from a 1992 book. The pH level of sugar is neutral, but isn't it more accurate to state that dental cavities are a result of sugars instead of low, neutral or high pH level? 71.112.173.40 (talk) 14:15, 24 March 2014 (UTC)

Turns out it's right, at least according to the source I added. And the pH of sugar isn't the issue, it's the pH of the salivary fluid, which can either retard or enhance bacterial growth. HCA (talk) 16:58, 24 March 2014 (UTC)