Talk:Toponymy

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List of "New" place names[edit]

For reasons that even I can't fathom (*), I've suddenly become interested in places named after other places - but not just any old eponyms, only those that start with "New" (New England, New Zealand, New York .....). I assumed, on the WP:WHAAOE principle, that we'd already have a list of such places, but if we do, I can't find it.

If one were to create such a list, what would be the best title: List of place names starting with "New"? I'm sure we could improve on that.

(*) I recently got to wondering which "New" place is the closest to its parent place (if that's the right term), and that train of thought has lead me here. But why I was wondering that in the first place, ...... Ah, the creative process at work in all its ineffable and majestic beauty. -- Jack of Oz [your turn] 23:49, 3 April 2012 (UTC)

Heh, just the kind of geotrivia I'm a sucker for. My first thought--beside wondering if such a list would long survive or be deleted--was about Nova Scotia and other "New" place names that don't use the English word "New". But I can't think offhand how to describe such a list. As far as the closest "old" and "new" places, I would guess there must be many cities with old and new parts, and so named. The first that comes to mind is Laredo, Texas and Nuevo Laredo, adjoining along the US-Mexico border. Pfly (talk) 05:51, 4 April 2012 (UTC)
Stewart has a classification of place names in his Book "Names on the Globe". He calls them either "Shift-Names" (place names which relate to other places on the globe) or commemorative names (names with the purpose to preserve some memory, but that also includes, for example, "Vancouver"). --ZielGruppe (talk) 08:35, 16 April 2012 (UTC)
I think Jack had a good idea with "List of place names starting with 'New,'" or maybe just "Place names including 'New'" to make it more of an article than a straight-up list. Simple, straightforward, exactly what someone else interested in the subject would type in the search box. Also, since this is the English language Wikipedia, I don't think it's such a big deal to just use the word "New" in the title; there's no reason that should preclude discussing places using non-English variations like Nuevo and Nova. I'd recommend against using "shift-names" or "commemorative names" as the title or even as a re-direct as they seem like broader topics, unless it was made into a proper article (rather than a list), as the terms could then be discussed properly. Milhisfan (talk) 05:57, 20 April 2012 (UTC)
In "Place names including 'New'" there would be an awful lot of places called Newton, Newport, Newcastle...... etc. Ghmyrtle (talk) 09:30, 20 April 2012 (UTC)
Of course, so we'd need to confine it to usages of the form "New <space> <Parent name>". Newfoundland wouldn't qualify, but if there were a place called Foundland and somewhere else was named New Foundland, directly after Foundland, that would qualify. Creating a list of these places is pretty easy; coming up with a really good article title is the real challenge. -- ♬ Jack of Oz[your turn] 06:44, 21 April 2012 (UTC)

Citation needed for usage pattern[edit]

I've added a cn tag to the statement "toponym has come to replace 'place-name' in professional discourse among geographers." It may be true, but I wasn't able to confirm it here or here vs. here (place name vs. toponym = 32,300 vs. 12,300 hits). Doremo (talk) 09:50, 25 June 2013 (UTC)