Talk:Transport in Saudi Arabia

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ironic - the paragraph says only that the highways are considered to be in a very bad condition, and yet the photograph shows a modern freeway that is indistinguishable from freeways in North America, other than the colour of the signs and the use of Arabic script!

Surely, then, there must be some variation in highway, with many roads of two-lane or narrower, often gravel, with washouts and potholes, with some modern roads near major cities.

gcapp@northwestel.net


Well, of course not ALL roads are in bad condition. Generally speaking, roads in Riyadh and some of the Eastern Province are truely modern. However, the major highways connecting between cities and those inside (not in downtowns) are in a pathetic condition. There are holes as deep as 2 meters. For instance, when it rained in Riyadh (rain in Riyadh is lighter than a shower in America), a major highway was filled with water (good planning!) that a bus couldn't stop before getting into water in a lower area. Results: a few students died, nothing else happened. That was just a simple example off the top of my head. -- Eagleamn 06:08, May 28, 2005 (UTC)



Today, I found some interesting photos (taken in Khobar), have a look:

........ Eagleamn 10:14, Jun 1, 2005 (UTC)


I've been driving around in Saudi as well as in neighboring countries such as in Qatar and Bahrain, I wouldn't say that there is any huge difference between those and Saudi. Of course the roads in rural areas aren't kept in as good shape as the major highways, but the same is pretty much true to other neighboring countries as well. There are washouts on roads sometimes after heavy rains and sand dunes moving on top of the road, but if the roads are in active use those are usually fixed relatively quickly.

Does anybody have any facts about the claim that the roads are in worse condition than in neighboring countries (besides those photos, but occassional washouts happen elsewhere as well if there's very heavy storm and the bottom of the road is just sand)?

Regards, tliuska