Talk:Traumatic brain injury

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Good article Traumatic brain injury has been listed as one of the Natural sciences good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it.
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Sports Related Traumatic Brain Injuries[edit]

Sports Related Traumatic Brain Injuries is an orphan (no other articles link to it). Any ideas on integrating this material? ~KvnG 22:47, 24 March 2014 (UTC)

Therapeuic hypothermia[edit]

... might actually be good doi:10.1186/cc13835. JFW | T@lk 19:55, 28 April 2014 (UTC)

Moved[edit]

All of this was inserted at Neurodevelopmental disorder, and is off-topic there. I am copying it here in case anything can be incorporated here. SandyGeorgia (Talk) 21:28, 27 February 2015 (UTC)


In industrial nations, the most common causes of childhood brain trauma are overwhelmingly falls and transportation-related incidents.[1][2] Child maltreatment such as shaken baby syndrome can produce neurodevelopmental consequences including blindness, neuromotor deficits and cognitive impairment.[3] According to information published by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, sports injuries account for 21% of the US incidence, however their site includes transportation-related sports injuries. They assert that cycling produced 64,993 head injuries requiring emergency room visits in 2007 while the second most common cause, football, only produced 36,412.[4]

There are age differences for the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children due to changes in skull formation. Infants’ skulls are divided into eight separated bones, which can spread during TBI and decrease the cranial pressure and brain swelling. These bones normally fuse by two years of age. In contrast, children are more vulnerable during TBI than adolescents, because they have wider subarachnoid spaces with blood vessels, which can become damaged by the shearing forces.[5]

Psychiatric disorders may worsen or develop de novo in a child following TBI. Statistically about 54% to 63% of children develop novel psychiatric disorders about 24 months after severe TBI, and 10% to 21% after mild or moderate TBI, the most common of which is changes in personality. [6] The symptoms include affective instability, aggression, disinhibited behavior, apathy, and may last for 6 to 24 months on average. Other disorders that may arise are ADHD, PTSD, OCD, anxiety disorder, depressive disorder and mania. Most symptoms decrease between 12 to 24 months. The superior frontal lesions correlate with the type of outcome, but more importantly, subcortical network damage may affect the recovery due to the lesions in white matter tracts. [6]

Studies show that children with severe TBI are affected in intellectual functioning, executive functioning (including speed processing and attention), and verbal immediate and delayed memory with some recovery during the first 2 years post-injury. Such children are at more risk for long term consequences of TBI, because of the crucial developmental stage at which recovery takes place. [7] The dynamics of recovery are correlated with pre-injury adaptive ability and environmental social factors (e.g. family support).[8]

References
  1. ^ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (March 2006). "Incidence rates of hospitalization related to traumatic brain injury—12 states, 2002". MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 55 (8): 201–4. PMID 16511440. 
  2. ^ "TBI in the US". 
  3. ^ "Child maltreatment prevention scientific information: consequences". 
  4. ^ "NeurosurgeryToday.org |What is Neurosurgery |Patient Education Materials |sports-related head injury". Retrieved 2008-08-17. 
  5. ^ Mason CN (November-December 2013). "Mild traumatic brain injury in children". Pediatric Nursing 39 (6): 267–282.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  6. ^ a b Max JE (January 2014). "Neuropsychiatry of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury". Psychiatric Clinics of North America 37 (1): 125–140. doi:10.1016/j.psc.2013.11.003. 
  7. ^ Babikian T, Asarnow R (May 2009). "Neurocognitive outcomes and recovery after pediatric TBI: meta-analytic review of the literature". Neuropsychology 23 (3): 283–96. doi:10.1037/a0015268. PMC 4064005. PMID 19413443. 
  8. ^ Anderson V, Godfrey C, Rosenfeld JV, Catroppa C (February 2012). "Predictors of cognitive function and recovery 10 years after traumatic brain injury in young children". Pediatrics 129 (2): 254–61. doi:10.1542/peds.2011-0311. PMID 22271691. 

Semi-protected edit request on 28 February 2015[edit]

I would like to add information to the section "Severity" about the age differences on severity or, perhaps, add a section about "pediatric TBI". It's important to mention about it because there are major differences that take place. Here is information I'd like to be added:

There are age differences for the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children due to changes in skull formation. Infants’ skulls are divided into eight separated bones, which can spread during TBI and decrease the cranial pressure and brain swelling. These bones normally fuse by two years of age. In contrast, children are more vulnerable during TBI than adolescents, because they have wider subarachnoid spaces with blood vessels, which can become damaged by the shearing forces.[1]

Psychiatric disorders may worsen or develop de novo in a child following TBI. Statistically about 54% to 63% of children develop novel psychiatric disorders about 24 months after severe TBI, and 10% to 21% after mild or moderate TBI, the most common of which is changes in personality.[2] The symptoms include affective instability, aggression, disinhibited behavior, apathy, and may last for 6 to 24 months on average. Other disorders that may arise are ADHD, PTSD, OCD, anxiety disorder, depressive disorder and mania. Most symptoms decrease between 12 to 24 months. The superior frontal lesions correlate with the type of outcome, but more importantly, subcortical network damage may affect the recovery due to the lesions in white matter tracts.[2]

Studies show that children with severe TBI are affected in intellectual functioning, executive functioning (including speed processing and attention), and verbal immediate and delayed memory with some recovery during the first 2 years post-injury. Such children are at more risk for long term consequences of TBI, because of the crucial developmental stage at which recovery takes place.[3]

Ebuglo (talk) 16:48, 28 February 2015 (UTC)

References
  1. ^ Mason CN (December 2013). "Mild traumatic brain injury in children". Pediatric Nursing 39 (6): 267–282. PMID 24640311. 
  2. ^ a b Max JE (January 2014). "Neuropsychiatry of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury". Psychiatric Clinics of North America 37 (1): 125–140. doi:10.1016/j.psc.2013.11.003. PMID 24529428. 
  3. ^ Babikian T, Asarnow R (May 2009). "Neurocognitive outcomes and recovery after pediatric TBI: meta-analytic review of the literature". Neuropsychology 23 (3): 283–96. doi:10.1037/a0015268. PMC 4064005. PMID 19413443. 
Hi, Ebuglo. I've altered your post a bit to add PMIDs to your sources (I hope you don't mind). Your final source, PMID 22271691, is a primary study, so that sentence isn't cited according to WP:MEDRS, but the other sources are recent reviews. I haven't checked your text, but will ping Doc James and Jfdwolff, who are better equipped to determine if the text can be added, and where. Best regards, SandyGeorgia (Talk) 22:59, 28 February 2015 (UTC)
Hi, SandyGeorgia Thank you for checking PMIDs. Indeed, I didn't catch the mistake about the last article. Thus I have deleted the last sentence. Doc James and Jfdwolff , please, let me know if that would be possible to incorporate my added content accordingly. Kind regards. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ebuglo (talkcontribs) 15:07, March 2, 2015 Ebuglo (talk) 20:08, 2 March 2015 (UTC)
Ebuglo, you can sign your entries by adding four tildes ( ~~~~ ) after them; pinging other editors doesn't always work, and it doesn't work on unsigned entries. I cannot add your proposed text as I don't have full journal access, and this is listed as (not sure it is) a Good Article, so I'd rather have Doc James or Jfdwolff look at the proposed content. SandyGeorgia (Talk) 15:31, 2 March 2015 (UTC)
last paragraph is empty of content, pretty much. affected to what extent, in what kinds of injury? thx. Jytdog (talk) 21:00, 2 March 2015 (UTC)

I apologize for interference. I agree that this content does not quite fit into this page. I found another page with similar content on pediatric trauma. Ebuglo (talk) 18:38, 3 March 2015 (UTC)

i think you are doing great; i should have said that i find the 1st 2 paragraphs fine. The third just doesn't say anything. If you fix that i would support adding this to the article. Jytdog (talk) 18:46, 3 March 2015 (UTC)