Talk:Trevi Fountain

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Coins[edit]

Three coins: A legend says that it is lucky to throw coins with one's right hand over one's right shoulder into the Trevi Fountain. Throwing one coin in will ensure that the thrower will return to Rome. Throwing two coins ensures that the thrower will fall in love with a beautiful Roman girl (or handsome boy), and throwing three coins in ensures that the thrower will marry that girl or boy in Rome This modern tale is a way to explain the title "Three Coins in the Fountain" without seeing the movie. The real legend is just about a coin... but Russians dispute this theory. Wetman 22:05, 12 Feb 2004 (UTC)

a reported current interpretation is that two coins will ensure a marriage will occur soon, while three coins leads to a divorce. - Most websites on the topic say that you will meet a beautiful girl/handsome boy for two coins and marry that girl/boy for three coins. What is the source for this three coin divorce statement? --VTEX 20:51, 9 July 2007 (UTC)

Added image[edit]

A thank you to shy Wikipedian User:Wng. Wng's image gives sense to the words of the description, and this entry gells at last! Wetman 18:15, 7 Jul 2004 (UTC)

Papal families[edit]

A recent editor, offended the the Holy Fathers' family names were mentioned, suppressed them. I have returned them. In the areas of artistic patronage and of Renaissance and Baroque princely politics, the family alliance of a pope is very often relevant. If Lorenzo II de' Medici was made Duke of Urbino, it is useful to know that the Medici Pope Leo X made the gift; Bernini's Barberini patron is a Barberini pope. This is common practice in the literature, and it aids the reader. With modern popes, of course, all this would be irrelevant. Wetman 20:54, 20 Sep 2004 (UTC)

That Pope Urban VIII was a Barberini is of course significant. It is not significant in the context of this article, which does not discuss who the Barberini are, or what is their significance. That Nicholas V was a Parentucelli, and Clement XII a Corsini, is, so far as I am aware, utterly insignificant. If you'd like to have "Pope Urban VIII (formerly Cardinal Barberini)," I would be fine with that, although I don't see why it matters in the context of this article. john k 23:42, 20 Sep 2004 (UTC) hi

Reverted[edit]

sorry Wetman, what did u want to say?? did u change what I added because it was ambiguous or what? what u wrote doesn't make much sense to me... The fountain is not on the center of the omonimous "county" (rione), but on the edge, and the changes of the political division were almost all before the fountain to be built, so they obviously could not affect it. Alessio Damato 15:29, 6 September 2005 (UTC)

"According to the current political division of the center of Rome, it is placed in the rione Trevi." A perfectly true statement. But why the suggestion that its placement in Rione II Trevi is a modern one? --Wetman 22:57, 6 September 2005 (UTC)
I think you mean why I said current, since it has always been like this... The political division of the center of Rome kept on changing during the centuries, and the rione Trevi was made only after the middleages. Anyway the fountain has always been there, and in fact took its name from that. What I wrote is quite redundant, but it's better to be clearer, I think. Alessio Damato 17:52, 7 September 2005 (UTC)
Clarity being my initial concern, how can one say that the Trevi fountain has been "placed in" the rione that historically grew up around it. Your understanding is correct: your edit could use some tweaking (not by me). --Wetman 23:44, 7 September 2005 (UTC)

Ghost story[edit]

the last time I was in rome I went on a tour and as a part of the tour we stoped by the Trevi Fountain. The tour guide told us a ghost story as an explanaition for why the top right window is boarded up and then painted to look like a regular window. Has anyone else heard this story or does anyone have an alternate explanaition?--Sekela3rd 14:55, 14 July 2007 (UTC)

I was around the Trevi Fountain for about 5 hours last december, also on a tour. Had a chat with the local guide, and he didn't seem to mention about any ghost story. ĞavinŤing 04:33, 22 October 2007 (UTC)
I have removed the caption about the "ghost" and the corresponding link as I don't think WikiAnswers is a reputable source. No other sources could be found to substantiate why the window is bricked. --CPAScott (talk) 16:36, 6 November 2008 (UTC)

Swimming woman[edit]

The fact that swimming is not allowed might be worth mentioning, but the story of the woman swimming in the fountain seems really non-notable. Any reason why it shouldn't be deleted? 137.22.227.141 (talk) 05:10, 13 March 2008 (UTC)

Agreed. An unidentified woman swims in the Trevi Fountain, and this rates a mention in the encyclopedia? Let's build consensus to remove it. Rivertorch (talk) 15:29, 13 March 2008 (UTC)


Roberto Cercelletta[edit]

I think is a very relevant story regarding the fountain. It made it to the NYTimes: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=950DEFDA1E3BF934A3575BC0A9649C8B63 The article also has other factual information that is noteworthy

205.160.23.2 (talk) 16:14, 17 September 2008 (UTC)

Height and width[edit]

Are we sure this thing is 26m high and 20m wide? In the photos, it plainly looks wider than it is high. --Doradus (talk) 20:28, 6 November 2008 (UTC)

Four years, no response. I've replaced these clearly incorrect dimensions with more realistic ones from trevifountain.net. --Doradus (talk) 13:59, 7 December 2012 (UTC)

Building behind it?[edit]

What's that building behind the fountain? Plomp (talk) 03:46, 21 May 2009 (UTC)

I asked this question when on a tour of Rome. "The building is part of the fountain" was the best answer they could give. Just what is done in the building, remains a "secret" apparently. 138.162.8.57 (talk) 15:15, 11 May 2012 (UTC)

The building behind the fountain is Palazzo Poli. Antique RoseDrop me a line 20:00, 11 May 2012 (UTC)

TREVI[edit]

Perhaps it should be mentioned somewhere that what is now called the Eurpean Union Justice and Home Affairs (EU JHA) was originally founded at a meeting nearby the Trevi Fountain at the European Council meeting in Rome on December, 1-2 1975. Therefore parts of the EU JHA was officially called TREVI until it changed its name to EU JHA in the 1992 Maastricht Treaty. Source: TREVI —Preceding unsigned comment added by 83.177.143.118 (talk) 02:16, 3 December 2010 (UTC)

In Popular Culture[edit]

The Fountain is mentioned in http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wysZdtiWf4. 94.30.84.71 (talk) 14:28, 30 June 2013 (UTC)