Talk:Triumphal arch

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Temple Bar[edit]

  • Could the Temple Bar in London count as a triumphal arch? I'm not too sure about adding it. --Andrew 00:08, 25 May 2005 (UTC)

hi —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.127.136.83 (talk) 00:10, 3 October 2007 (UTC)

Certainly, although it was not freestanding. It was also a symbolic gate of course, but that does not rule it out.Johnbod 11:37, 4 October 2007 (UTC)

Moscow[edit]

Is this [1][2][3] a triumphal arch?--Nixer 16:50, 2 October 2005 (UTC)

No, this is a wooden gate to the All-Russia Exhibition Centre. --Ghirlandajo 11:48, 7 October 2005 (UTC)
Many of the listed archs also serve as entrance gates into cities or parks.--Nixer 20:55, 20 October 2005 (UTC)

The last arch[edit]

When and where it was built the last arch in the world? When it was built the last arch of Roman Empire/Bysantine Empire?

Brandenburg Gate Berlin[edit]

Removed it as it isn't a triumphal arch.

It was part of the old Berlin toll city wall and was left in place.(anon.)

(Speechless!) --Wetman 07:42, 31 October 2006 (UTC)

It's neither free standing (former toll houses), nor built separately from city gates or walls. It doesn't fit the definition in the article, either change the definition, or remove the gate.

It also wasn't built specificly in honour of a victory (anon again).

La Grande Arche de la Fraternité[edit]

should it be mentioned as the world's largest triumphal arch? it's over twice the height of the Arc de Triomphe.

But, by definition , a triumphal arch is built in honor of a military triumph... if you look at Le Grande Arche, it was built in honor of humanitarian advances... far from the military conquests of Napoleon or the Romans that triumphal arches are most closely associated with. 'Scuse any grammar errors, --Screenmaster16 04:26, 31 March 2007 (UTC)

Changed England to United Kingdom[edit]

The arches in London are there because it is the capital of the United Kingdom. The Wellington Arch is there to celebrate a British victory, while Marble Arch doesn't actually celebrate a victory as such, unless the fact that it has frescos of Empire mean that it celebrates the building of an empire on which the sun did not set. Anyway, they were both built after 1707, so they're British.

Chrisfow 21:38, 30 May 2007 (UTC)

why you dont take the arc of Carabobo in Venezuela?[edit]

the trimphal arc of the batle of Carabobo is very significative!! please investigate about him! hehe sorry by mi english i m from venezuela!! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 190.78.37.239 (talk) 20:50, 1 March 2008 (UTC)

Do it yourself, it's the goal of Wikipedia. If there is any mistakes, other will correct it for you S23678 (talk) 19:02, 1 June 2008 (UTC)

Gallery picture[edit]

If the gallery is meant to show some of the more grand or beautiful arches, I feel that the Canadian "[Princes Gates]" in Toronto is much more fitting of a Canadian arch than the currently shown one in Kingston. Does anybody object to changing the pictures? Canking (talk) 15:19, 1 June 2008 (UTC)

I think there is place for the two arches. The RMC one, in Kingston, is an important memorial still in "active" use today, as the names of the fallen ex-RMC students in Afghanistan have been added to the arch recently. It is as well a Triumphal Arch as it shows all the main campains fought by ex-RMC students. s23678 (talk) 18:04, 1 June 2008 (UTC)

It was part of the old Berlin toll city wall and was left in place

Somebody wrote that last comment "It was part" and signed it with my signature. Is their any way to find out who that was or if they changed anything to the site? Canking (talk) 02:22, 30 June 2008 (UTC)

Spasskie gates[edit]

Shouldn't Spasskie Gates, constructed by Petrus Antonius Solarius in Moscow also be included? They have dedication in Latin above the portal.--Dojarca (talk) 14:52, 17 August 2008 (UTC)

Corinthian Arch at Stowe[edit]

If no one objects I'm going to remove this - it's not a triumphal arch...

You have a fortnight or forever hold your peace! Egg Centric (talk) 23:48, 16 January 2011 (UTC)


Removed specifics[edit]

I removed the following text, which seems a bit off topic but which someone might like to check and use elsewhere, like Arch of Titus or Arch of Constantine:

The Arch of Titus, is one of the oldest surviving arches in Rome, built in about 85 AD in commemoration of Rome’s Victory in the Jewish war and of the ruler who brought about the victory, Emperor Titus. There had been much hostility between the Jews and Romans over the years, and in 67 AD the Jews revolted. Titus’s, father Emperor Vespasian, was originally in charge of squashing the Jewish war, until he later ascended to the thrown, leaving Titus in charge. Within the arch, a relief of chiseled stone, shows one of Titus’s final plays in the war's final days. The relief depicts Titus and his men sacking and burning a Jewish temple. Another depicts Titus’s glory through a progression of horses drawing him in a chariot.[1]

The Arch of Constantine was created in Constantine the I honor and his accomplishment in the Battle of the Milvian Bridge. During this time Diocletian enacted the use of the tetrarchy consisting of 2 senior, 2 junior emperors and heredity played no part in succession. Maxentius, son of a previous senior emperor Maximian, in his pursuit of power drove out Senior Emperor Severus and others' attempts to squash him were thwarted until Constantine I. According to a Roman figure, Christ came to Constantine guaranteeing his victory if he put his trust in the lord and mark his army’s shields with the cross. The three arch inscription at the very top of the arch emphasizes his victory in many glory worthy words. And below that, there are several reliefs that, depict his leadership in and out of battle. One of which shows Constantine I using his words to lift up soldier morale while another shows outsiders surrendering to his will. The arch also includes many incorporations of Roman gods, although Constantine was supposed to have converted to Christianity after the battle.[2]

AdventurousSquirrel (talk) 13:10, 2 December 2013 (UTC)
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