Talk:True Stories (collection)

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Notability[edit]

I am not sure if this artice should be prod'ed without a bit of debate. I will list a few sources that talk about the collection of poems, just to see if I can come up with enough; but I do feel that there is probably enough information on this collection to meet notability guidelines:

True Stories takes over where Two-Headed Stories left off, the title being parodic in the double sense that there are no true but only "two-headed stories", "The true story is vicious / and multiple and untrue" (11). <ref name=Nischik> Nischik, Reingard M. ''Margaret Atwood'' Boydell & Brewer (2000)p.110 </ref>.

In a collection of poems titled True Stories (1981) Atwood posits a world of irrational barbarity where tragedy...becomes meaningless because cruelity and death are wholly gratuitous. Some of these poems are set in the Caribbean and, as George Woodcock has observed, read "like verse abstracts of the more harrowing Amnesty International reports.But in their spare directness these poems are among the most effective Atwood has written, for the pose some of the most difficult questions the author has raised concerning the relation of art and moral committment.<refname= Stouck>Stouck, David. ''Major Canadian Authors''. U of Nebraska Press (1988) p.288</ref>

I think the book might also meet the guidelines for being the subject of many courses at universities at the undergraduate and post-graduate levels. Mrathel (talk) 16:23, 8 April 2009 (UTC)
However, I do feel that this article can not stand as it now appears. there must be more information on the page to prove that the subject is notable, and the several articles on Atwood's collections all fall under this category.Mrathel (talk) 12:25, 10 April 2009 (UTC)