Talk:Tswana language

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Linguistic brush up[edit]

Someone mentioned that the 'g' is an alveolar fricative, not a velar one. is anyone certain about this? Additionally, does anyone know the jargon term for when a languages only phonemes can be consonant-vowel, i.e. a word can not end with a consonant or begin with a vowel => two consonants or two vowels cannot follow one another. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Reilyjanson (talkcontribs) 00:25, 10 March 2009 (UTC)

/x/ <g> is indeed a velar fricative, but unlike the article stated, it is not pronounced further back that the "h" in "house". It's actually pronounced further forward with /h/ being a voiceless glottal fricative.

I'm not sure on a specific word for languages which have a consonant-vowel syllable structure, but it would be written CV. The CV represents the syllable structure of the language showing a compulsory consonant in the onset position and a compulsory vocalic rhyme meaning all syllables are open. CV also shows that two consonants or two vowels cannot occur next to each other. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.148.76.132 (talk) 16:27, 10 May 2009 (UTC)

Question on Tsetse[edit]

Hey everyone,

I'm writing the article on Tsetse and have a question for those who know Tswana. As I understand the history of the word tsetse, it comes originally from Tswana, being the generic word for fly.

Does tsetse indeed mean fly in Tswana?

What is the relation between Tswana and Sotho?

(The latter word was suggested as a possible origin for the word tsetse and may be a different language or dialect or an old word for the same language.) I hope to confirm this origin since I don't know either language. Thanks for any help.

Please leave any info on this page: Talk:Tsetse fly.

thanks, Acuster 04:03, 2 Apr 2005 (UTC)

Answered there. mark 23:19, 3 Apr 2005 (UTC)

Tonal?[edit]

Is it a tonal language? The article should mention this. Badagnani 07:18, 5 April 2007 (UTC)

It is not a tonal language to the extreme that Mandarin is, but tone plays a much stronger role in Setswana than it does in, say, English. reilyjanson

If tone is semantic how can it not be marked in writing? Or is it?--87.162.16.110 (talk) 04:36, 28 November 2009 (UTC)

A humble request[edit]

Would anyone happen to know the answer to the question here: Wikipedia:Reference desk/Language#Use of full-stops, closing brackets, commas etc in Setswana? Please help. Thanks, Zain Ebrahim (talk) 17:42, 1 July 2008 (UTC)

Setswana Syntax[edit]

Is there any chance of adding a section on Setswana Syntax and Verb Conjugation? 58.161.52.156 (talk) 04:47, 18 January 2010 (UTC)

Tswana phrases[edit]

I have moved most of the Tswana phrases which were found in this article up to and including this revision to Wiktionary, where I thought it would be more appropriate. The phrases can now be found here. - Llonydd (talk) 17:46, 16 May 2011 (UTC)