Talk:Turbidity current

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Transatlantic telephone cables were broken in the Grand Banks earthquake in 1929. The [transatlantic telephone cable] article says the first telephone cable was laid in 1956. Was it telegraph cables that were broken in 1929?63.78.97.2 (talk) 16:43, 6 February 2008 (UTC)


--Speed of sound--

The fourth paragraph of the introduction says "Turbidity currents can reach speeds up to half the speed of sound". Does this refer to the speed of sound in the air or in water? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.21.142.18 (talk) 01:22, 8 October 2013 (UTC)