Talk:U.S. Route 95

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Highway versus Route[edit]

This "names by SPUI" nonsense has got to stop: "U.S. Highway 95" is almost 10 times as common as "U.S. Route 95", and the MoS says the "most common name"' should be used, regardless of what is considered to be "official". 24.19.35.187 00:50, 14 August 2006 (UTC)

I would agree. But see Wikipedia:State route naming conventions poll. --Rschen7754 (talk - contribs) 01:31, 14 August 2006 (UTC)
There is something fundamental here. Let me be technical first. A "route" is a software thing, and a route can be changed at will. Also, I can choose my route from here to there over several different highways. A "highway" is a hardware thing. A highway is built with bulldozers, concrete reinforced with steel, and asphalt, and it has bridges in it, too. A highway is not easily changed. Therefore, people who use "route" instead of "highway" are not thinking clearly.
Furthermore, think of the Internet and what a router does. The route that is chosen is completely a software thing.
When I was a boy, the major road in our area was always called "Highway 31". My family also used "Highway 78" a lot, and sometimes "Highway 80", "Highway 82", "Highway 231", and "Highway 331". It was all very clear.
98.67.171.176 (talk) 16:37, 16 August 2012 (UTC)
The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, the body that is in charge of assigning designations in the United States Numbered Highway System calls the individual components, "U.S. Routes". In Michigan, for an example, the article is titled U.S. Route 41 in Michigan, but the local vernacular and DOT usage is to call it "US Highway 41", so the prose uses "Highway" instead of "Route". This is perfectly acceptable, and in fact, that article, plus U.S. Route 2 in Michigan and U.S. Route 131 have been rated as Featured Articles, the highest assessment assigned to "our finest work". For consistency in article titles though, even if the state uses "Highway" over "Route", the AASHTO nomenclature is used. I hope this helps. Imzadi 1979  20:32, 16 August 2012 (UTC)
Ah, but there you see why you are wrong. The article follows the history of the "route", not the "physical highway". It mentions how the "route" has changed "highways" over time. So, this article is, even by your definition, correctly identified as being "US Route 95". Famartin (talk) 01:49, 17 August 2012 (UTC)

"Future" section[edit]

"The third stage, ... is expected to start mid-to-late 2006 and is not expected to be completed until late 2007 or early 2008." - so what actually happened ? - Beardo (talk) 21:05, 15 March 2008 (UTC)

The directions of highways[edit]

The directions of highways have been described from north-to-south or from east-to-west for thousands of years. This is something that goes all the way back to Ancient Rome. If you do not believe that, it goes all the way back to colonial times in American and the early years of our Republic, such as in the National Road.
Furthermore, the mileposts of the U.S. Highways in this country are numbered from north-to-south or from east-to-west, with the lowest numbers on the north or on the east.
In some states, the mileposts are numbered from north-to-south or from east-to-west by counties, but in most states, this is done uniformly all the way across the state. For example, in Georgia, milepost 1 on U.S. Highway 41 is locted one mile south of the border with Tennessee, and the highest number is located close to the border with Florida.
All of the descriptions of U.S. Highway 95, either for the whole highway, or by the states, should be presented in north-south order.
Once again, this is something that has been done for centuries: describing things, including highways, in the north-south order, in a contiguous way. For example. What were the original 13 states of the United States?
Answer: New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. We never see them listed starting with Georgia and going north.
98.67.171.176 (talk) 17:00, 16 August 2012 (UTC)

Actually, the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices specifies that mileposting starts at the southern or western terminus (or state border) and proceed northerly or easterly except in the case of a full beltway, where it runs clockwise. Since that's how the numbers run, that's how the text runs. Imzadi 1979  20:22, 16 August 2012 (UTC)

How far does Highway 95 go in Oregon ?[edit]

How far does Highway 95 go in Oregon ?
Nowhere in this article does it give the length of Highway 95 in Oregon.
This is something lacking.
98.67.171.176 (talk) 17:06, 16 August 2012 (UTC)