Talk:U.S. state

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History[edit]

I think we could use a "history" subsection here. The problem for foreigners is often "why doesn't the federal government dictate standardization for the states." It makes no sense to them. The 13 colonies each developed separately with close ties, not to each other, but to Great Britain. Ties to each other came late in the 18th century along with a lot of suspicion as to the motives and culture of the other states. A constitution was based on that. And it continued over to new states, despite the fact that the new states did, indeed, have close ties with the federal government, though did want to establish their own identify. This is why Normandy and Brittany are long gone, Quebec redefines it's municipalities with regular confusion every few years, but we still have Rhode Island! A "bottom up" government, rather than "top down."