Talk:USS Princeton (CVL-23)

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Princeton survivors taken prisoner by Japanese warships[edit]

Is there, if any chance, of Princeton survivors to have swam into any Japanese warship, and later to be taken prisoner? hmssolent\Let's convene 01:54, 29 April 2011 (UTC)

I would say that there was zero chance any Princeton survivors were pulled out of the water by Japanese warships. There was about a six hour period from when the bomb hit Princeton, until the ship was abandoned, and more than another hour before USS Reno put two torpedoes into Princeton, to sink it. Although some Princeton Sailors were forced/blown over the side during this period, most likely responded to the "abandon ship" order as best as can be expected under these conditions. In any event, those who survived (108 died) would have been in the water around Princeton. There were many other U.S. Navy ships very close by to recover those in the water; Princeton was operating as part of a very large group (TG 38.3) which included three other carriers, two battleships, four cruisers, and twelve destroyers. Finally, no Japanese warships were anyplace close. Ozawa's decoy force was still many miles away to the north; it would never enter the waters where 38.3 was operating. Thomas J. Cutler's "The Battle of Leyte Gulf" has an excellent discussion of Princeton's ordeal. Cutler also mentions that sea conditions were rough that day, so in the odd event that a survivor was not recovered by other USN ships before sunset, it is unlikely that person would have survived the night.SeymourBears (talk) 12:06, 31 August 2013 (UTC)

USS Princeton ship wreck[edit]

"The Man Who Made the Monitor" by Olav Thulesius is a biography on John Ericsson, who created many inventions, including steam powered fire engine, the first screw-propelled warship, and multiple hot air engines. This book talks about many ship disasters but the USS princeton has multiple chapters on its diaster that some how connect to the naval architect, John Ericsson. — Preceding unsigned comment added by RYANMURR (talkcontribs) 23:47, 3 February 2012 (UTC)