Talk:United States House of Representatives

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Former featured article United States House of Representatives is a former featured article. Please see the links under Article milestones below for its original nomination page (for older articles, check the nomination archive) and why it was removed.
Main Page trophy This article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on September 5, 2006.
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Congressman vs. Representative[edit]

Which one to use? Discussion at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Politics#Congressman vs. Representative. --Philosopher Let us reason together. 00:35, 15 November 2012 (UTC)

Precipitate Transition from 112th to 113th Congress[edit]

If you'll pardon the lazy resort, the page has been improperly updated to reflect the results of the 2012 elections as if they had taken effect. Thus, in multiple places it says that there are 201 voting Democratic Members, whereas that won't be the case until the Members are sworn in in January, 2013, and the 113th Congress begins. (Some changes did occur already in cases where special elections elected Members to the remainder of the 112th.) Someone with more time and energy than I have may wish to remedy these errors. Czrisher (talk) 21:52, 9 December 2012 (UTC)

Seating: L or R from which point of view?[edit]

It says at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_House_of_Representatives#Daily_procedures "...Members' seats are arranged in the chamber in a semicircular pattern and are divided by a wide central aisle. By tradition, Democrats sit on the left of the center aisle, while Republicans sit on the right, as viewed from the presiding officer's chair...." The statement "...as viewed from the presiding officer's chair...." seems to be at odds with the diagram under "Structure" in the data box at the beginning of the article, which shows the Democrats on the left and the Republicans on the right as viewed from the FLOOR, looking TOWARD the presiding officer's chair. Wikifan2744 (talk) 19:04, 19 November 2013 (UTC)

Research now allows me to say that the answer to my question above is that the diagram under "Structure" in the data box at the beginning of the article is correct: the Democrats sit on the left and the Republicans sit on the right as viewed from the floor, looking toward the presiding officer's chair. The relevant evidence comes from http://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/House-Chamber/House-Floor/ which is: "Unlike the Members of the Senate, Members of the House have no assigned seats but are by tradition divided by party; Members of the Democratic Party sit to the Speaker's right and Members of the Republican Party sit to his left." Therefore, I will reverse in the article the words "left" and "right" in the current version of the sentence quoted in my earlier post. Wikifan2744 (talk) 08:28, 21 November 2013 (UTC)

Voting Rights of Delegates and the Resident Commissioner[edit]

It has been my understanding that the "non-voting" House members from the five organized unincorporated U.S. territories and D.C. have the right to vote in Committee but not on the House floor. The article, however, states at the end of the Apportionment section that since 2011 they may no longer vote in Committee. The statement cites an NPR interview regarding the 2011 House rules changes in footnote [8] and H.R. 78 of the 110th Congress in footnote [9]. I'm assuming that the information in H.R. 78 is irrelevant since apparently the bill was never passed by the Senate. The NPR interview mentions the removal of the Delegates' and Resident Commissioner's voting rights on the House floor, but it makes no mention of their Committee voting rights. So either I need correction or the article needs either correction or a reference supporting the removal of the Delegates' and Resident Commissioner's Committee voting rights; please help.

HankW512 (talk) 12:56, 25 September 2014 (UTC)

Using the term "power of the house is to pass federal legislation" is inaccurate.[edit]

The statement "The major power of the House is to pass federal legislation that affects the entire country" is not the right statement. "Federal" has meaning in the context of the "Federal Principle" espoused by Madison in the Federalist Papers #51. However, is in not a "power" of Congress. The major power of the House is to "pass United States legislation. The U.S. Constitution nowhere mentions the term federal. The federal principle upon which it rests include the People, the United States and the States. The legislation that Congress passes is referred to in Article III, Section 2, as "the Laws of the United States. It is also not true that their legislation (effects) the entire country. Each piece of Legislation either only effects the specific places where that legislation touches, or the States who have volitionally opted into what is often called a "federal" benefit program. A better term might be that "the results of the legislation impact" the entire country. It ultimately has that effect. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.176.55.5 (talk) 17:01, 4 December 2014 (UTC)

The overwhelmingly vast majority of innumerable sources refer to Congress (including the House) as passing "federal" legislation. And most laws that Congress passes are "public laws" that are considered "laws of general applicability", applying across all 50 states unless Congress specifically restricts the scope of the law more narrowly. As for states having to opt in to a "federal benefit program", yes, it's true that Congress cannot constitutionally pass laws that "commandeer" state executive branches to enforce federal spending programs, but Congress can pass laws that restrict states from taking certain actions with their own tax dollars, and Congress can also enforce its own spending programs in every state that refuses to enforce the program. Congress can also pass laws that don't involve spending programs, and unless they are held to be unconstitutional, states must follow them. –Prototime (talk · contribs) 19:29, 4 December 2014 (UTC)