Talk:United States naval aviator

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There are a host of 'naval aviators' listed in Wikipedia[edit]

"A Naval Aviator is a pilot in the United States Navy..."

Other nations have naval aviators too...  ;-)

Felix c 21:10, 9 August 2006 (UTC)

Many of these naval aviators are not (or were not) members of the United States military. This article should either be expanded to cover the generic reality or the title should be modified to reflect the narrow specificity of its subject.Markm62 19:47, 10 October 2006 (UTC)

Just because other navies have pilots doesn't mean they actually call them "Naval Aviators". This appears to be a USN-specific term, at least in origin, and one which USN "pilots" are very proud to use. Unless someone can provide specific reliable published sources showing that other navies officially call their pilots by this term, I'd recommend moving this page back to plain Naval Aviator. - BillCJ (talk) 05:58, 28 February 2008 (UTC)

Navy C-130?[edit]

Does anyone have any info to back up the US Navy's C-130 Hercules program? --ProdigySportsman 23:34, 27 March 2007 (UTC)

Try Data on Aircraft in the Current Naval Aviation Inventory on the USN site.
See also:
Granted, these are not front-line transport units, but they are US Navy organizations which use USN naval aviators as pilots for these Navy-owned and operated aircraft. - BillCJ (talk) 05:45, 13 February 2008 (UTC)

no section for the Osprey[edit]

There is no seciton for the tilt rotor MV-22 Osprey. It is currently being used by the Marine Corps and also will be in the Navy and Air Force's inventory. --ProdigySportsman 23:42, 27 March 2007 (UTC)

sevice obligation?[edit]

The section on service obligation contradicts itself... RP459 (talk) 02:32, 6 February 2009 (UTC)

Marine Helicopter Pilots service commitment[edit]

The six year commitment has been extended to eight years beginning for pilots issued wings in 2010. Should be updated.

I would think that it would be prudent to wait until the rule is in effect prior to updating the article... RP459 (talk) 20:52, 24 December 2009 (UTC)

Naval Aviator Insignia[edit]

Insignia is the plural, insigne is the singular form.

Usage Note: Insignia in Latin is the plural form of insigne, but it has long been used in English as both a singular and a plural form: The insignia was visible on the wingtip. There are five insignia on various parts of the plane. From the singular use of insignia comes the plural insignias, which is also acceptable. The Latin singular insigne is rare and may strike some readers as pedantic.

Probably is pedantic. Just thought I'd mention it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wgmleslie (talkcontribs) 03:00, 9 September 2010 (UTC)

Capitalizaton?[edit]

Why is Naval Aviator capitalized throughout this article? Isn't it like any other title, it should only be capitalized when used before someone's name?

Examples:

1. Naval Aviator Tom Jones flew combat missions in Vietnam.

2. A naval aviator is a qualified pilot in the United States Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard.

Actually it is not a title, it is a qualification, so this suggestion is unequivocally correct. Naval aviators are called such because "pilot"s are (traditionally) mariners who guide ships through hazardous or congested waters.--Reedmalloy (talk) 22:20, 28 August 2012 (UTC)

Naval Aviation Pilots - Silver Eagles[edit]

Naval Aviation Pilots (NAPs), were enlisted pilots. They wore wings identical in every respect, including the color, to officer Naval Aviators. Have researched this topic extensivley and have asked well over 100 Sliver Eagles if they ever saw an NAP with silver wings. Each insisted there was never any such thing; all wore gold. Some of the confusion might be from observer wings. Between January 1927 and October 1929 the design of Naval Aviation Observer Wings was the same as Naval Aviator Wings except the observer wings were silver. See http://www.history.navy.mil/avh-1910/APP20.PDF, page 663. Other confusion might come from the NAPs fraternal organization, the Silver Eagles. If anyone can come up with a reliable source that says NAPs EVER wore silver wings, please provdide that source. Additionally, see http://bluejacket.com/sea-service_nap_index.htm or Enlisted Naval Aviation Pilots, by Harold H. Kelly, William A. Riley, Silver Eagles Association - 1997.E2a2j (talk) 17:25, 20 July 2012 (UTC)

An Officer and a Gentleman[edit]

This article mentions that "Officer and a Gentleman" is a portrayal of API. Isn't it, in fact, about OCS (or more precisely AOCS) when it was conducted at NAS Pensacola? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.226.27.222 (talk) 00:00, 13 January 2013 (UTC)