Talk:University education in Nazi Germany

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http://www.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/Preprints/P73.PDF

one-sided article, bad language[edit]

Aside from being written in bad English, this article contains a number of oversimplistic statements (e.g. it was not Heidegger who introduced the "Führerprinzip" to Freiburg University; the Nazi Minister of Education required it) or factual errors (e.g. there has never been a "Führer" of Freiburg University, only a "Rektor"). Also, the author focuses only on academics who fell victim to the Nazi terror because they were Jewish or perceived as being Jewish (like Arnold Bergstraesser, a protestant Christian with Jewish background) by the regime. There is little mention of non-Jewish German academics (e.g. Adolf Lampe, Constantin von Dietze, Gerhard Ritter, to name professors of Freiburg University only) who were expelled, imprisoned or killed because of their political resistance to the Nazi regime. The section "Nazi professors" is little more than a list. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 77.25.213.103 (talk) 22:12, 10 November 2008 (UTC)

This is a weak article as it is factually incorrect in a number points firstly, the gross over emphasis of Heidegger's role in the Nazi University system, yes he supported the notion of the furer, but he was only Rektor from 1933-34 and was widely regarded as an abject failure; secondly Walter Benjamin was never a professor as such could never have lost his position, the reason why is in the Walter Benjamin article - also no mention of resistance groups are mentioned such as the white rose. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 210.54.72.106 (talk) 11:44, 14 July 2009 (UTC)

This article is quite appropriate to American education as degraded by liberalism and political correctness. A monolithic educational bias exists to support and extend a biased political view. Speech codes and other restrictions severely limit and direct speech, behavior, and academic direction. Indeed, these efforts began in Germany with the philosophical bases of the 1930s. Those with conservative views or who attempt to teach accurate American history, American / Western values, free market principles, or Conservatism are soon hounded and banished from the Academy, or barred outright. Those who attempt to lecture with differing opinions are shouted down at the lectern, abused, sometimes physically assaulted, and chased from the podium. The list of those expelled are not Jewish, but now is a long list of Conservatives. Combine this with the "dumbing down" of the Academy, and the parallels with a fascist system are striking. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.255.113.27 (talk) 03:17, 17 October 2009 (UTC)

What does this mean in proper English?[edit]

"The Reichsuniversität produced a collection of 76 Jewish bodies killing Auschwitz prisoners." —Preceding unsigned comment added by 87.158.202.139 (talk) 06:02, 12 December 2010 (UTC)

I clarified that point with a reference. --Anneyh (talk) 08:29, 12 December 2010 (UTC)

Reichsuniversität Posen[edit]

"The University of Poznań was closed by the Nazi Occupation in 1939. It was reopened 1941 under the name of "Reichsuniversität Posen"" - false. Not reopened. Reichsuniversität was different (professors, students). German Reichsuniversität professors and Gestapo burn 8 000 Polish people in krematorium (File:Uniwersytet Rzeszy w Poznaniu - krematorium.jpg), so it wasn't continuation of Polish University of Poznań, it was German nazi university in Poland. See Polish article Hermann Voss and Reichsuniversität Posen. "Reichsuniversität Posen nie był kontynuatorem rozwiązanego przez hitlerowców 21 września 1939 polskiego Uniwersytetu Poznańskiego, ani istniejącej w latach 1903-1919 pruskiej Akademii Królewskiej w Poznaniu." Jakubtr (talk) 13:32, 28 July 2012 (UTC)