Talk:Unreliable narrator

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Use in video games.[edit]

Should be a list of video games that have used this technique. Indigo prophecy, and Spec Ops: The Line, both come to mind. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.247.138.52 (talk) 04:46, 28 May 2013 (UTC)

Agreed, I would also mention Portal and The Stanley Parable. --Babomancer (talk) 17:15, 23 October 2013 (UTC)

This is a very good idea, especially since in some video games you're actually playing the unreliable character yourself (unlike The Stanley Parable and Portal where there are actual "narrators" that are unreliable), like Braid, BioShock and Heavy Rain. --Spug (talk) 19:01, 31 March 2014 (UTC)
Under Wikipedia policy you will need independent sources (other than yourself) that show that the narrator is, in fact, unreliable. Also, the article lists only the most important cases. It doesn't list all cases. Maybe you should start a list "List of unreliable narrators". Xxanthippe (talk) 21:39, 31 March 2014 (UTC).

Missing the most familiar unreliable narrator[edit]

R2D2. 71.23.111.214 (talk) 23:00, 9 October 2013 (UTC)Jj

Abba's "Money, Money, Money" and the Unreliable Narrator[edit]

If you're interested, Abba's "Money, Money, Money" is still an example of unreliable narrator, as confirmed to me by Carl Magnus Palm. Suit yourselves. Peace. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2.124.41.60 (talk) 22:51, 11 January 2014 (UTC)

Edit by Xxanthippe: why revert a correction?[edit]

The user changed "Naïf" to "Naíf" (incorrect) and "Rashômon" to "Rashomon" (unnecessarily simplified). When corrected, the reason s/he gave for reverting my edit was: "Thanks, but we would like a policy for this". I don't understand. Do you want a policy for not correcting mistakes? For introducing typos? El Bit Justiciero (talk) 02:53, 12 February 2014 (UTC)

To six edit editor: this should be simple- what policy are you following in making your edit? Xxanthippe (talk) 03:31, 12 February 2014 (UTC).
Answering a question with another question is no answer. Can you explain why did you change the correct form "Naïf" to the incorrect form "Naíf"? This is not a power struggle, it's a matter of fact. (Also, I have made many edits with an older handle, but that's immaterial.) El Bit Justiciero (talk) 07:43, 12 February 2014 (UTC)

Fight Club (the book) not an example but movie is?[edit]

Title should be self explanatory, why isn't the novel listed as an example? Is it just not considered significant or recognizable next to the movie? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.116.8.168 (talk) 07:54, 25 September 2014 (UTC)

Unreliable narration?[edit]

Does anybody agree that much of the sections « Definitions and theoretical approaches » and « Signals of unreliable narration » is in fact unreliable narration? --Clifford Mill (talk) 13:58, 7 November 2014 (UTC)

A wider view?[edit]

The German page has more on the theory and more examples, while the Dutch page has further examples. --Clifford Mill (talk) 13:59, 7 November 2014 (UTC)