Talk:Vincenzo Scamozzi

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Zbarazh castle[edit]

Several Ukrainian, Russian, Polish references attribute Zbarazh Castle to Scamozzi. Can anybody knowledgable comment on the grounds for such an attribution? If Scamozzi was its architect, then Zbarazh should be added to the list of his works. --Ghirlandajo 23:47, 16 December 2005 (UTC)

What documents support the supposed visit by Scamozzi to Poland in 1599? Could he have been able to do more than give a few suggestive sketches? Are there Scamozzi touches in Polish 17th-century buildings that did not appear in contemporary engravings? Until archives turned up in post-Communist Warsaw, in the Warsaw University Archive, no one had heard of the Dutch architect Tilman van Gameren (1632 – 1706), a pupil of Jacob van Campen, whose very Italian palaces and villas seem to be quite liberally scattered in Poland. Where did Stanislaus Herakliusz Lubomirski, Tilman's patron, find the Dutch architect? In Venice. In Poland, those designs would have been interpreted, not as Dutch, but as Italian, as the introduction by the director mentions in the EU museum professionals' association Codart's Courant 8 (on-line, as a pdf document: http:www.codart.nl/Downloads/Courants/courant8new.pdf ). There is an essay in that issue by Antoni Ziemba, "The Low Countries and Poland" that sketches the pan-European view of elite Polish culture: you'll want to read it. My own quite uninformed hunch would be that the earlier presence in Poland of such intermediary designers as Tilman, bringing Italianate idiom in their portfolios, together with the close-knit expatriate communities of Italian builders, stuccadori and other craftsmen also working in an Italian idiom, offer the real connection between Polish buildings and Scamozzi. For Zbarazh, shouldn't one say it was "designed in a post-Palladian Italian idiom similar to Scamozzi's by the Dutch architect van Peyen, 1626–31"? Wetman--05:58, 17 December 2005 (UTC)
Thanks for your informative explanation. I'll insert your phrasing into the article on Zbarazh. --Ghirlandajo 12:17, 17 December 2005 (UTC)