Talk:Volcanic plug

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Volcanoes (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Volcanoes, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of volcanoes, volcanology, igneous petrology, and related subjects on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Geology (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon Volcanic plug is part of WikiProject Geology, an attempt at creating a standardized, informative, comprehensive and easy-to-use geology resource. If you would like to participate, you can choose to edit this article, or visit the project page for more information.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
Note icon
This article has been marked as needing an infobox.

Devils Tower, USA[edit]

Is the Devils Tower a volcanic plug? The National Park Service of the U.S. Department of the Interior wrote here:

Other theories have suggested that Devils Tower is a volcanic plug or that it is the neck of an extinct volcano (an unlikely theory, for there is no evidence of volcanic activity - volcanic ash, lava flows, or volcanic debris - anywhere in the surrounding countryside)!

Jan D. Berends (talk) 22:37, 5 February 2008 (UTC)

The feature is almost certainly a laccolith-the remains of an ancient intrusive flow of magma into the earth's crust millions of years ago.The surrounding rock is all sedimaentary and at one time would have been higher than the Tower. Erosion was caused by -almost certainly -at the end of the last ice age which released a mammoth flood of melt water through modern central USA-the central plains. The old intrusive flow is much harder and resisted rapid erosion thus standing up above the modern landscape. There are many of these features in the USA. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 222.152.198.245 (talk) 22:28, 1 November 2011 (UTC)

Reference footnotes for Sigiriya paragraph not working.[edit]

I couldn't figure out the formatting used by the editor, and so could not fix them.

Sigiriya[edit]

"Sigiriya, or the Lion's Rock or the Lion's Mountain, is a hardened magma volcanic plug formed from an extinct and long-eroded volcano."

I've seen this being repeated on several places in the internet, but there is no primary source to back up this claim. For example this paper on the geology of Sri Lankan archaeological sites (including a section on Sigiriya) does not mention an extinct volcano or a volcanic plug.

Uvants (talk) 03:25, 30 October 2013 (UTC)

Removed it from the list and the image from the gallery per the solid pdf you link above. Vsmith (talk) 13:15, 28 February 2014 (UTC)