Talk:Volcanology of Mars

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Solar System / Mars (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Solar System, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the Solar System on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Mars.
 
For more information, see the Solar System importance assessment guideline.
WikiProject Volcanoes (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Volcanoes, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of volcanoes, volcanology, igneous petrology, and related subjects on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Geology (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon Volcanology of Mars is part of WikiProject Geology, an attempt at creating a standardized, informative, comprehensive and easy-to-use geology resource. If you would like to participate, you can choose to edit this article, or visit the project page for more information.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Expanding this into article[edit]

I plan to move most of the volcanism material from the Geology of Mars article into this stub.Schaffman (talk) 11:19, 2 December 2010 (UTC)

Seems reasonable. The Geology of Mars article is way too long. Volcanoguy 12:22, 2 December 2010 (UTC)

Yup, way too long. I need to shorten it considerably. Also, this article needs work. I'm in the process of rebuilding it. Schaffman (talk) 14:04, 2 December 2010 (UTC)

Go for it! --BatteryIncluded (talk) 15:43, 2 December 2010 (UTC)

Nature of Volcanism[edit]

I'm creating a brief subsection on the nature of magma and how it reaches the surface. I think this is necessary in order to understand how volcanism on Mars and Earth are thought to differ. Schaffman (talk) 14:01, 4 December 2010 (UTC)

Current Volcanism[edit]

"It is generally accepted that the interior of Mars is too cold to sustain any active lava flows."

I don't think this statement is true. Is there a reference? Some lava flows on Mars may be younger than several million years, which is only the last tenth of one percent of Martian history. It's highly unlikely that volcanism would have completely ceased only in this last brief interval of time. Schaffman (talk) 23:51, 6 December 2010 (UTC)

Only seismology will tell us whether the interior of Mars is still active. As far as hot-spots, none has been detected through IR observations. Cheers, --BatteryIncluded (talk) 14:36, 7 December 2010 (UTC)

I think we both agree that no volcanic activity is currenty occurring on Mars, and that scientists have detected no IR signatures of active vents or fumaroles. My objection is to the phrase: "It is generally accepted that the interior of Mars is too cold to sustain any active lava flows." First, no one knows how cold (or warm) the interior of Mars is. That would require heat flow measurements, which we don't have. Second, heat from the interior does not "sustain" lava flows. It generates magma, which may or may not (usually not) reach the surface in a volcanic eruption. Third, based on the previous two points to say without attribution that "it is generally accepted" is patently false. I hope this helps. Best wishes. Schaffman (talk) 17:13, 7 December 2010 (UTC)

We are in agreement. My post was in support of yours and of deleting that entry. You are doing a wonderful job on this article. Cheers, --BatteryIncluded (talk) 18:27, 7 December 2010 (UTC)

Thank you. That's very kind. Schaffman (talk) 20:33, 7 December 2010 (UTC)

It would be nice if every paragraph in this article had sources. Volcanoguy 00:29, 2 March 2011 (UTC)
You're right. Many of the paragraphs lack references. I'll try to address this as time allows. Thanks. Schaffman (talk) 13:51, 4 May 2011 (UTC)
I think that we have to specify how young is the youngest lava flow. In the article introduction, there is a 2006 speculation by Michael Carr that there may be dormant volcanoes today; and under the "Potential current volcanism" it states that a visual inspection (ESA) suggest the youngest lava flows are about 2 million years old.
However, a 2011 update can be quoted: The author states that although the 2 million years claim has been done, no systematic study of young volcanic surfaces had been performed so far. His research proposes that the "youngest lava flows" occurred in the last few tens of millions of years. I'd like update the article accordingly; I welcome your input and corrections to my edits. Cheers, BatteryIncluded (talk) 15:33, 4 October 2013 (UTC)
@BatteryIncluded - FWIW - Yes, I *entirely* agree with you re updating the article if you like - no problem whatsoever on my part - Enjoy! :) Drbogdan (talk) 16:55, 4 October 2013 (UTC)

Plate tectonics[edit]

"UCLA scientist discovers plate tectonics on Mars" http://newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/ucla-scientist-discovers-plate-237303.aspx?link_page_rss=237303 Sidelight12 (talk) 12:49, 11 August 2012 (UTC)

I agree in that the article can benefit from this discovery; Although Mars does not exhibit active plate tectonics now, it states that Mars had none. Evidence amounts to that it did have some elementary movement/split early in its history (2500 mile long fault system) and that now it may be in "stagnant lid convection". A few more references, and maybe a rebuttal (if any) would be a nice improvement too.
Cheers, BatteryIncluded (talk) 19:04, 4 October 2013 (UTC)