Talk:Volga Germans

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This is barely English, poorly organized, and I have a bad feeling about it. It's reminiscent of User:H.J.. Vicki Rosenzweig 21:50 18 Jul 2003 (UTC)

Yes, it could be better written, but from the history, people from 2 different IP addresses (clearly not from the same subnet) editted it before I touched it. (And for one of them, English not her/his first language.) And from my knowledge of Russian history, it appears to be accurate so far -- it's clearly a stub.
If you'd like, Vicki, I'll add it to my watch list & help it along. I'm willing to take the risk that this won't become another point of bitterness here on WikiP. -- llywrch 03:45 19 Jul 2003 (UTC)

The Article Germans from Russia which is about an American ethnic group has been redirected here, truncated and merged. I think it should go back to being an independent article. The story of the Volga Germans, is also very interesting and can be substantially expanded, but is really a different story as the division between the two groups generally occured before the Revolution. The only contact most Americans of German-Russian heritage ever had was an occasional pitiful letter from distant relatives. Fred Bauder 15:59, Apr 5, 2004 (UTC)

I second that. Let's start from the separation within the current article first. Mikkalai 16:52, 5 Apr 2004 (UTC)

I have created a stub German-Russian for information on people of German ethnic background who have adopted Russian culture such as Lenin or Vilyam Genrikovich Fisher.

--- My sources are people I "interviewed" - my parents and grandparents OGT



Volga-germanism of most of thse people is not verifiable in wikipedia. NOt to say what Catherine the Great is doing here.

John Hessler ,John Klein, Leroy Lehr. Adolph Lesser, Svyatoslav Richter, George Henry Sauer, Nancy Jones Schaefer, Willard Schmidt, Alfred Schnittke, Ron Schuele, Armin Mueller-Stahl , Benjamin F. Brack, Oscar Brosz, Al Duerr, Merle Freitag, Charles Gemar, Jim Geringer, Count Hans Moritz Haucke, Richard Hieb, Robert W. Hirsch, Joseph Kessler, Otto Krueger, Roland Kunfeld, Count Fyodor Petrovich Litke, Reuben Metter, David J. Miller, Allen Neuharth, Toby Roth, Harvey Wollman, Dr. George P. Epp, and Rudy Wiebe

I suspect these lists were simply copied from some webpages. Many of the persons are probably not famous. You cannot just trow a bunch of names into an encyclopedia without saying a word about them, unless the name is of world fame. But in the last case at least a stub is reasonably to expect. Please clean this up. Mikkalai 20:50, 17 May 2004 (UTC)

Personal observation only, but according to my dad (first generation German-Russian American), Lawrence Welk is indeed a German Russian (grew up in the same area in ND as my dad and is a distant cousin, apparently) and so is Tom Daschle. I'm sure this can be found out with a quick Google--I'm too lazy to do it right now. Katr67 22:07, 30 June 2006 (UTC)

Serious historical error in this article[edit]

A portion of this article has significant error in it.

First, the Black Sea Germans would not like to be associated in name with the Volga Germans. Their primary migration to that region occurred after 1800 and was not influenced in any way by Catherine who died in 1796. The migration was separate and distinct from that of the Volga Germans and occurred under different circumstances.

Second, Catherine the Great's Manifestos applied to all Europeans, not just Germans. Germans happened to respond in greatest numbers due to conditions in regions where they lived. Some Russian Germans make much of the fact that she was German herself but this in no way had anything to do with their migration to the Volga River region.

Third, based on the above, Germans had no special privileges in Russia that did not also apply to other ethnic groups that migrated under the Manifesto terms.

Sources: Human Capital by Roger Bartlett; From Catherine to Kruschev by Adam Giesinger

I have therefore modified the article to incorporate this information.

Jerry Frank FranklySpeaking_at_shaw.ca —Preceding unsigned comment added by 209.89.225.107 (talkcontribs)

"Health Consequences"[edit]

There was information pasted into the article directly from this source:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=3345066&dopt=Abstract

It is possible it might fit into the article if it were properly paraphrased and wikified. Katr67 21:59, 30 June 2006 (UTC)

Proper redirect of Germans from Russia?[edit]

This may be another form of the issue raised by FranklySpeaking, but I do not think that the redirect of Germans from Russia to this article properly belongs here. The Germans who settled in the Beresan (near Odessa) certainly are not Volga Germans. Agent 86 03:30, 28 July 2006 (UTC)

  • Thinking of it for another minute, and then noticing that the redirect was set up in 2004, I decided to be bold and change the redirect to a more suitable article, History of Germans in Russia and the Soviet Union. Not the best, but better than to this article. Agent 86 03:33, 28 July 2006 (UTC)
Germans from Russia and Volga Germans should stay separate articles. The Russian Mennonites for example are something like Germans from Russia, but only about 1 percent of them used to live in the Volga area.--Wikipeeta (talk) 23:48, 1 February 2011 (UTC)

Some Argentines of Volga German descent[edit]

In Argentina, Volga Germans had settled in colonies, in some specific provinces, wich are mentioned in Spanish version. Therefore, it is not so difficult to identify who is of Volga German descent. Here there are some of them (it's not a complete list):

Andrés Klipphan (journalist), Jorge Gottau (creator of "Colecta Más por Menos", bishop of Añatuya), Gabriel Heinze (soccer player, currently in Manchester United), Enrique Fischer (better known as Pipo Pescador, houmorist, actor), Héctor Omar Hoffmann (better known as Sergio Denis, singer, actor), Raúl Daniel Schmidt (soccer player, Club Olimpo), Claudio Fernando Graf (soccer player, Club Atlético Lanús), Enrique Rau (bishop, well known for his humanitarian labour), Naty Hollmann (also known as Naty Petrosino, elected "International Woman of the Year"- 2006- by the Autonomous Region of Valle d'Aosta in Northern Italy), Carlos Kaspar (actor), Alejandro Guinder (lawyer, founder of "Festival del Folklore de Cosquín"), Juan Eduardo Esnáider (soccer player), Cristian Breitenstein (mayor of Bahía Blanca), Jorge Novak (founder of "Movimiento Ecuménico por los Derechos Humanos"), Víctor "Vity" Zwenger (soccer player), Javier Herrlein (musician, former member of group Catupecu Machu), Mauro Gerk (soccer player), Jorge Mayer (bishop of Bahía Blanca), Romina Mohr (journalist, Canal 9).--Chipppy 03:08, 27 January 2007 (UTC)

Merger with Germans from Russia[edit]

The Germans in Bessarabia and in Odessa Oblast were not Volga Germans and it is hard to see how information about them belongs in an article with this title. Is there an article Black Sea Germans? User:Fred Bauder Talk 17:51, 16 December 2010 (UTC)

File:VictoriaKanasaVolgaGermanStatue.jpg Nominated for Deletion[edit]

Icon Now Commons orange.svg An image used in this article, File:VictoriaKanasaVolgaGermanStatue.jpg, has been nominated for deletion at Wikimedia Commons for the following reason: Deletion requests June 2011
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Photo of Gateway Theatre/Copernicus Center is irrelevant[edit]

It may be true that there were Volga Germans who resettled in the Jefferson Park neighborhood of Chicago, but I see no reason for why the photograph of the current Copernicus Cultural and Civic Center be shown in this article. The building was originally constructed as a movie theatre in 1930 by an American firm. It later was turned into the Copernicus Center, which is in honor of the Polish community that has a very large influence and presence in the Jefferson Park neighborhood.

The building has absolutely nothing to do with Germans, whether they were from Volga or anywhere else, and including it without an explanation in this article is misleading. If someone was to select a photograph to represent the Jefferson Park neighborhood, I would suggest choosing one of the Jefferson Park Branch of the Chicago Public Library, or of the actual Jefferson Park. Although the Copernicus Center is a prominent landmark in Chicago, it just simply has nothing to do with the Volga Germans, and should be removed from this article, in my opinion. --Saukkomies talk 02:00, 27 September 2011 (UTC)

text misleading inconclusive and philosoviet[edit]

Deutsch speaking migrants were not settled in Russia but in territories conquered by Russian imperialism, i.e. that didn't have any native Russian population or Ukrainians. Thereby, they were the first to urbanize and develop territories, something that is not criticized when done by Anglos, and Zionist even have birthrights in Western culture. They were used by Russians to conquer Muslim territories in the grasslands of southeast Siberia. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 189.149.128.119 (talk) 18:37, 9 February 2012 (UTC)