Talk:Voodoo Child (Slight Return)

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"Voodoo Chile" and "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" are two separate songs[edit]

Sometimes there is some confusion regarding two songs that Hendrix recorded that were released on Electric Ladyland. "Voodoo Chile" is the 15 minute studio jam song that he recorded with Cassady and Winwood. "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)", the 5+ minute song was later recorded by the Experience. These are the spellings from handwritten notes that Hendrix sent to his record label Reprise which they used for the original US album release. The UK Electric Ladyland album spelled the shorter Experience song "Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)"; when it was later released in the UK in 1971 as single, it was misnamed "Voodoo Chile" without the "(Slight Return)" designation (see Voodoo Chile#Confusion over title). It is important to keep this in mind when reading references and editing the articles. —Ojorojo (talk) 14:07, 3 June 2014 (UTC)

srv "cover"[edit]

im sitting here watching his austin city limits performance as we speak and he plays "Voodoo Chile" not "voodoo child (slight return)" so im removing it. just pick up the dvd at best buy or at least look at in when you are in the store. it says right on the box "voodoo chile" thanks goodbye 74.192.29.148 (talk) 17:57, 2 August 2008 (UTC)

Voodoo Chile/Voodoo Child[edit]

According to this 'pedia there are two songs, Voodoo Chile Blues, and Voodoo Child (Slight Return), but on the album Electric Ladyland spells em both Chile, so i was wondering whether this article should be renamed?

JimHxn 20:02, 22 August 2006 (UTC)

No...it's Child the second time! In fact, in the inlay you can see Hendrix's original notes, with "Chile" changed into "Child".
Another Hendrix fan 18:59, 9 September 2006 (UTC)

I've just checked the original release vynal cover (the one with the naked chicks), and it says in plain, legiable, Roman script: 'Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)' JimHxn 17:43, 2 December 2006 (UTC)

There are 3 titles that I know of:

Voodoo Chile Vodoo Chile Blues Voodoo ChilD (Slight Return)

I have just uploaded an image of the original vynal of Electric Ladyland, showing the title as voodoo chile:

Electricladylandside4.jpg

JimHxn 20:31, 13 January 2007 (UTC)

Dunno, I think it's a common mistake, I'm pretty sure the real tilte is Voodoo ChilD (Slight return)

But that image is the original vynal! Thus, it must be correct! JimHxn 19:23, 15 January 2007 (UTC)

The original acetate of this album (came before any vinyl version) was entitled "Electric Landlady" Dinlo juk 19:58, 8 August 2007 (UTC)

This says that at 1.35 you can hear him saying "I need help" - I slowed it down and listened to it and at this point I hear him saying "Might even". Is there a reference for this? 203.184.33.239 05:29, 14 February 2007 (UTC)

Minor variations, perhaps, but they are the same song. I'm suggesting the pages be merged. backstabb 19:17, 26 September 2007 (UTC)

I'm no Jimi Hendrix expert, but I have my copy of that album with me right now and I am looking at it and on mine, it says "Voodoo Child (Slight Return) with a D. (Admittedly, I always wondered why on one it's Voodoo Chile and on the other it's Vodoo Child.) Pippin the Mercury (talk) 13:58, 8 June 2008 (UTC)

See Talk:Voodoo Child (Slight Return)#"Voodoo Chile" and "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" are two separate songs above. —Ojorojo (talk) 14:15, 3 June 2014 (UTC)


Origins and recording[edit]

Someone makes reference to Jimi introducing the song and relating it to the Black Panthers. I don't know why that has been singled out. Jimi often referred to it as the new American anthem. -- Mickraus 18:45, 14 September 2007 (UTC)

I added that the song became Hendrix's longest official studio cut. I Cited Room Full of Mirrors by Charles Cross.--Groupsixxx (talk) 19:33, 2 June 2014 (UTC) M.H.

Added Jack Casady as a guest musician on the song. Cited David Stubbs' Jimi Hendrix:Voodoo Child: The Stories Behind Every Song --Groupsixxx (talk) 19:43, 2 June 2014 (UTC) A.G.

Added that Noel Redding Stormed out of the studio due to an argument he had had with Hendrix. Cited Gary J. Jucha's Jimi Hendrix FAQ. --Groupsixxx (talk) 19:54, 2 June 2014 (UTC) A.H.

Changed the recording date to May 3, 1968 because the recording technically began at 7:30 am that morning. I cited Charles Cross' Room Full Of Mirrors--Groupsixxx (talk) 20:23, 2 June 2014 (UTC) C.H.

/* Origins and recording */ Added Hendrix's contributions as producer of the song by discussing his experimentation with overdubs and effects. Cited James Bush's Encyclopedia of Northwest Music. M.H. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Groupsixxx (talkcontribs) 21:43, 2 June 2014 (UTC)

See Talk:Voodoo Child (Slight Return)#"Voodoo Chile" and "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" are two separate songs above. —Ojorojo (talk) 14:15, 3 June 2014 (UTC)


Merge[edit]

  • Strongly Disagree - Is the rationale for a merge with Voodoo Chile based upon the above unpublished analysis/original research? If you consult a reliable source, such as the published Hendrix discography in (Shapiro, Harry & Glebbeek, Ceasar (1990). Jimi Hendrix: Electric Gypsy St. Martin's Press.), you'll see that the original release was Reprise 2RS 6307 with the title "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" and only the British version, Polydor 63 008/009, had the title "Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)". The Reprise track listing with "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" can also be verified on the All Music Guide.[1] The name confusion was noted by Ruhlmann, William, of the AMG while pointing out the correct title of "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)".[2] "Voodoo Chile" and "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" are two distinct songs each with a different melody and lyrics and are both individually notable on their own, so the suggestion to merge fails the good reasons to merge at: WP:MERGE. dissolvetalk 20:37, 26 September 2007 (UTC)
  • Strongly Disagree - "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" and "Voodoo Chile" are different songs, both musically and lyrically. There is no basis for the two to be merged. -- Mickraus 16:20, 27 September 2007 (UTC)
  • Strongly Disagree - These are two completely different songs, obviously the person who suggested this has never listened to Hendrix. If I remember correctly, it is Voodoo Chile (A Slight Return) not Child —Preceding unsigned comment added by 170.185.137.19 (talk) 16:21, 2 November 2007 (UTC)

Citation[edit]

I'd like to know how to cite the existence of a CD. A Citation Needed tag was placed by my comment in the Covers Section regarding The Best of Top of the Pops '70 CD containing a cover of "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)". Other than citing the label and catalogue number, which I had done already, what further citation is needed? -- Mickraus (talk) 12:36, 22 February 2008 (UTC)

Slight Return?[edit]

Would be great if there were an explanation of what this meant. Thanks - Vranak (talk) 20:29, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

I've always thought of it as similar to "reprise". -- Mickraus (talk) 12:15, 11 June 2008 (UTC)

I agree that an explanation would be great. I searched for this article with the single purpose of discovering the meaning of the words "slight return". I was disappointed, but not surprised, that there was no explanation. I have been searching for decades. -- a user, on the 1st of May, 2012 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 114.166.234.224 (talk) 09:20, 1 May 2012 (UTC)

Removed erroneous note of a Clapton/Winwood live cover[edit]

I removed from the list of cover versions an entry which stated that Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood played this song in their Feb 25, 2008 appearance at Madison Square Garden. They played "Voodoo Chile" not "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)". —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.90.21.82 (talk) 21:13, 13 November 2008 (UTC)



Title[edit]

HEY i've removed some vandalism from the page. please excuse my lack of heading on this, but i don't have any idea on how to do it. the person stated that 'hendrix had a huge dick like an annaconda flapping in the wind'. I removed the line.


I changed the release date in the information box near the title from September of 1968 to October of 1968. I cited James Bush's Encyclopedia of Northwest Music. --Groupsixxx (talk) 20:15, 2 June 2014 (UTC) C.S.H.

Reference called for[edit]

Unsure of how to implement reference for Jack Casady and Steve Winwood: http://www.rollingstone.com/news/story/6595946/voodoo_child_slight_return Nantucketnoon (talk) 21:58, 12 April 2009 (UTC)

Heavy metal[edit]

At the risk of starting a genre war, I would like to add heavy metal as one of this songs genre. My reason is this: Voodoo Child (slight return) sounds strongly like a heavy metal song. Both the guitar riffs and Hendrix's solo have a mid-70s, post-Black Sabbath, pre-Van Halen kind of feel to them. Specifically, the guitar riffs have the same kind of deep, distorted sound most heavy metal guitar riffs are known for.

 This brings me to my next point. People have said Led Zepplen is one of the first heavy bands. People also say that some of their songs, like Whole lotta love and Heartbreaker, are some of the first heavy metal songs. 

While I don't disagree with ether of these points, the two songs I mentioned have more in common with 70s hard rock than heavy metal. And yet both songs are almost always referred to as heavy metal, and I think it is somewhat unfair to cite two songs as heavy metal when they barely classify as such, when one song that actually SOUNDS like heavy metal isn't even acknowledged for it.

 I'd like to add Heavy metal and if someone has a counter-point to my argument, please feel free  to criticise me.  —Preceding unsigned comment added by Superceller (talkcontribs) 10:35, 30 December 2009 (UTC) 

Rolling Stone ranking at #101 greatest song[edit]

I looked at their "list" and it makes no musical sense that I can see. Who cares how Rolling Stone magazine ranked it? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.85.14.106 (talk) 11:11, 4 June 2010 (UTC)


I changed the song ranking for Voodoo Child (Slight Return) on Rolling Stone's 500 greatest songs of all time to #102 because they recently moved the songs ranking to #102. Didn't change the source because the Rolling Stone website has it listed as #102 when you click on the link.--Groupsixxx (talk) 19:20, 2 June 2014 (UTC) C.S.H

File:Voodoo Child (Slight Return) Single.jpg Nominated for Deletion[edit]

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Personell: Bass[edit]

On the Liner notes to the Electric Ladyland album, it mentions Jack Casaday as playing Bass on Voodoo Chile, although I believe it really on the slight return. http://aln2.albumlinernotes.com/Electric_Ladyland__93_.html — Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.94.45.90 (talk) 20:26, 28 August 2011 (UTC)


Changed the Personnel on the song to Jack Casady on Bass and Steve Winwood on Organ. Cited David Stubbs' Jimi Hendrix: Voodoo Child: The Stories Behind Every Song.--Groupsixxx (talk) 20:27, 2 June 2014 (UTC) M.H.

See Talk:Voodoo Child (Slight Return)#"Voodoo Chile" and "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" are two separate songs above. —Ojorojo (talk) 14:15, 3 June 2014 (UTC)


Composition and analysis removed as original research[edit]

The 'Composition and analysis' section added 1 December 2011‎ by 86.22.148.242 contains no citation and appears to violate Wikipedia's no original research policy. A reference would make it a worthwhile addition, however a brief search online turned up only the article. It seems to be a fair analysis, except for the gratuitous reference to Bohemian Rhapsody. BoboLink81 (talk) 17:59, 6 December 2011 (UTC) (Complete section pasted below prior to reverting.)

Voodoo Child is a blues rock song performed by The Jimi Hendrix Experience. The piece itself is performed by three people: Jimi Hendrix on guitar and vocals, Noel Redding on bass guitar and Mitch Mitchell on Drums (there is also a recording with an organ). The song is, or at least seems, very much improvised, as blues is renowned for being. The song is in D#m throughout with no key changes, the closest it gets is when the guitar uses notes from outside the scale. It starts with Jimi “messing” with a wah effect and picking palm-muted strings for a percussive effect, he then brings in the intro riff still using his wah effect. The drum comes in with syncopated bass kicks in time to some of the guitar notes accenting them. The main riff then comes in with a drum fill. The guitar uses the blues’ sharp 4 with a few note bends, hammer-ons and pull off are also used to add some legato. Jimi then takes off with a short solo which then moves to the first verse in which the guitar follows the vocal melody making the song homophonic; it would be monophonic but the bass playing a steady, rhythmic D# pedal note. The lyrics here are rather simple and repetitive, showing the instrumentation here to still be a rather large focus as opposed to some other songs like Bohemian Rhapsody with its accapella sections. The song then moves to a short pre-chorus which shies away from the D# pedal point with C#m7 and Cm7 chords (both with no 5th) and after moving back to D# the song hits the chorus. The chorus is repeated twice throughout the song, both times followed by a solo. After the first time, another verse is played, this time with different lyrics, they still repeat though. The pre-chorus also has different lyrics and a different drum beat. After the chorus once again another guitar solo is played, this time the band don’t hold back and Jimi uses every guitar technique he can fit into just less than two minutes (about a third of the song!). These techniques include: hammer- ons and pull-offs, pitch bends, wah, tremolo picking, using the tone switch on the guitar to make a stuttered, staccato effect and many more. The song then fades out just as Jimi ends his solo leaving the song at 5 minutes 12, most of which is just Jimi soloing.

Same story with new 'Composition and analysis' section added 15:50, 29 January 2013 by user Xinoehp 17:36, 26 November 2013 (UTC) (Complete section pasted below prior to reverting.)

The song is based around improvisation, as blues is renowned for being. The song is in D#m throughout with no key changes, the closest it gets is when the guitar uses notes from outside the scale. It starts with Jimi “messing” with a wah effect and picking palm-muted strings for a percussive effect. He then brings in the intro riff still using his wah effect. The drum comes in with syncopated bass kicks in time to some of the guitar notes accenting them. The main riff then comes in with a drum fill. The guitar uses the blues’ sharp 4 with a few note bends, hammer-ons and pull off are also used to add some legato. Jimi then takes off with a short solo which then moves to the first verse in which the guitar follows the vocal melody with the bass playing a steady, rhythmic D# pedal note. The song then moves to a short pre-chorus which shies away from the D# pedal point with C#m7 and Cm7 chords (both with no 5th) and after moving back to D# the song hits the chorus. The chorus is repeated twice throughout the song, both times followed by a solo. After the first time, another verse is played. Another guitar solo then follows a chorus. This solo lasts just less than two minutes which is almost a third of the entire song duration. The guitar techniques used in this solo include: hammer-ons and pull-offs, pitch bends, use of wah pedal, tremolo picking, use of the tone selector on the guitar and many more. The song then fades out just as Jimi ends his solo leaving the song just over five minutes long. — Preceding unsigned comment added by BoboLink81 (talkcontribs) 17:36, 26 November 2013 (UTC)