Talk:WSAZ-TV

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Untitled[edit]

WSAZ is not the only TV station in the U.S. doing a split newscast. Its Gray Television sister, KOLN/KGIN in Nebraska, also splits off for part of its newscast, with viewers in Lincoln and Grand Island seeing different information.

First Privately Owned Microwave System[edit]

"As the nation's first privately owned microwave system, it was a remarkable feat for one of the smallest cities in the country at the time to have a television station." I do not believe this to be correct.

1. Lawrence Rogers says that WSAZ first picked up the over the air signal of WLWT in Cincinnati using a microwave relay located in Brown County, Ohio. It later dropped the WLWT feed because of too many technical glitches and then started picking up network programming sent via AT&T coaxial cable via microwave relay from Columbus.

See:

http://books.google.com/books?id=U58P6s4mx3cC&lpg=PP1&dq=lawrence%20rogers%20taft&pg=PA65#v=onepage&q&f=false

and

http://books.google.com/books?id=U58P6s4mx3cC&lpg=PP1&dq=lawrence%20rogers%20taft&pg=PA103#v=onepage&q&f=false

2. WSAZ did not have the "first privately owned microwave system". Crosley Broadcasting (WLW-C, WLW-D and WLW-T) had one in place beginning in 1949.

See:

The Crosley Microwave Network: http://www.earlytelevision.org/crosley_network.html

Cite Sources[edit]

This article does not cite sources within its history. For example,

Largely because of its pioneering status in the state and its unique newscasts, WSAZ is one of the country's most dominant television stations. It has been the far-and-away market leader for as long as records have been kept. WCHS and WOWK have rarely come close, though for a brief period in the late 1990s WOWK overtook WSAZ for first place in the northern (Charleston) side of the market.

Since WSAZ is one of NBC's strongest affiliates, rumors have persisted for some time that NBC has considered buying it. However, these rumors are speculative at best, especially since NBC recently sold four of its owned and operated stations located below market number 25. The Huntington-Charleston market is the 61st market. Rumors also abounded soon after the Gray Television purchase that WTAP would scrap its newscasts and simulcast WSAZ's newscasts instead. WSAZ has always covered Parkersburg events anyway, and has long been available on cable on the West Virginia side of that market. However, this is unlikely since A.C. Nielsen recently named WTAP the highest-rated NBC affiliate in the country. It should be noted that WTAP is the only commercial station in the Parkersburg market.

does not contain any sources on various controversial claims. Ajwebb 23:06, 12 January 2007 (UTC)


It amazes me how absolutely no one at WSAZ, including those who wrote this article, know the actual origin of the station's call letters. When the FCC was assigning broadcast licenses for the Appalachian region, the entire area was divided into the Eastern Appalachian Zone, the Western Appalachian Zone, the Northern Appalachian Zone, and the Southern Appalachian Zone. SAZ in WSAZ stands for Southern Appalachian Zone. My father appeared for 11 years on the original Saturday Night Jamboree and was there when the station began operating. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.164.51.58 (talk) 04:56, 27 May 2008 (UTC)

Grammar and Spelling[edit]

Whoever added Brooks Jarosz' name as "Brookz Jeros" obviously needs to check their spelling. You can find all of WSAZ's on-air talent at "News Bios on their web channel. Also, within on-air talent and notable alumni I have discovered multiple grammatic errors, such as "Paul Gessler- He done news and sports reports. He left February--, 2010." (Btw: the date was there, I just do not remember.) This was changed, like others to "Paul Gessler- Former Sports reporter/anchor, news reporter." None of the others reflect the departure date, so I removed Paul's. Also, I have noticed "hosted" being used alot in the section. It is not improper, but it bothers me personally (Idk why) so I changed it to "anchored," because it seemed like a more news-appropriate term. I welcome comments and replies. Mwhayes1995 (talk) 19:13, 12 February 2010 (UTC)

All good changes :) Good work! - NeutralHomerTalk • 19:18, 12 February 2010 (UTC)
Thanks for feedback! Mwhayes1995 (talk) 19:25, 12 February 2010 (UTC)