Talk:WWVB

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Antenna question[edit]

What kind of antenna is used for WWWVB? How high are the used masts?


How much Radio clocks[edit]

exists using WWVB? --Itu (talk) 17:23, 31 August 2012 (UTC)

In 2011, NIST estimated the number at 50 million. Owen× 19:11, 31 August 2012 (UTC)

phase modulation[edit]

The WWVB article currently says "A 1 bit is encoded by inverting the phase (a 180° phase shift) of the last 0.9 seconds of each UTC second."

My reading of ref 4 "Enhanced WWVB Broadcast Format" is that the ONLY phase shift occurs .1 seconds into each second so the phase (if inverted) stays inverted for 1.0 seconds (and .1 second into the next second).

The article comment of "0.9 seconds of each UTC second" is misleading as it seems to imply that a reverse phase shift occurs at the end of the second... — Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.90.10.170 (talk) 17:50, 14 December 2012 (UTC)

The article comment is correct, because a reverse phase shift does occur at the end of the second. Figures 2–5, beginning on page 3, make that clear. 71.41.210.146 (talk) 12:29, 8 April 2013 (UTC)

Antenna location discrepancy[edit]

WWVB antenna coordinates (from NIST, unknown datum))
North 40°40′51.3″N 105°03′00.0″W / 40.680917°N 105.050000°W / 40.680917; -105.050000 (WWVB - North antenna)
South 40°40′28.3″N 105°02′39.5″W / 40.674528°N 105.044306°W / 40.674528; -105.044306 (WWVB - South antenna)

A NIST press release gives antenna locations different from those in the article. The article's work well with Google maps, while NIST's do not. As they do not mention a datum, it is possible they are correct, but in whatever pre-WGS84 datum was used for the initial survey in 1962. I'm not inclined to fix what doesn't appear to be broke in the article, but I thought I'd mention it here for other people's comments.

71.41.210.146 (talk) 05:24, 13 May 2013 (UTC)

Removed text[edit]

I noticed that another person removed this text that someone else added. I don't have enough knowledge on WWVB signal to know if this is important or not, so I copied it here. • SbmeirowTalk • 03:34, 29 January 2014 (UTC)

Shortcomings of the current signal format
  • Unlike MSF and DCF77, WWVB does not have a built in tick around the minute mark to discipline clocks that are in continuous reception mode.
  • What MSF does (and almost identical DCF77) to indicate the start of a minute
  • If each second is considered as ten 100 ms pieces, the minute marker is transmitted as 1111100000, while all other seconds are transmitted as 1AB0000000.
The first statement is not true. WWVB transmits two consecutive periods of reduced-carrier signal, each 800 ms long and starting on the second, to indicate the top of the minute. The start of the second of these periods is the exact top of the minute. -- Denelson83 03:49, 29 January 2014 (UTC)
I'm the one who removed it and I of course agree with Denelson83 re the first statement. Re removal of the rest, we wouldn't put details of the WWVB format in the MSF or DCF77 articles; nor do their details belong in the WWVB article. Jeh (talk) 04:54, 29 January 2014 (UTC)
Removals were appropriate. Glrx (talk) 00:11, 30 January 2014 (UTC)