Talk:Wabar craters

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That the temperature in the 'Empty Quarter' reached 61 degrees C in 1994 contradicts the record books: the highest temperature ever recorded is, they claim, '136 F at Al Aziziyah, Libya in September of 1922.' Different sites give other readings, however (though none of these is above 61C). Perhaps this is something to do with reliability of measurement?

I am working on the St. John Philby bio. Any objections to changing his name to St. John Philby, seeing he is known as Harry St. John Philby Jack Philby and Sheikh Abdullah, among others and I am trying to standardize his name? Thx. Nobs 02:03, 24 Apr 2005 (UTC)

Considering that an expedition to the site occured in 1994, and that they mentioned using GPS, I was surprised that lat and long coordinates aren't shown here. So I did some digging. The USGS link already referenced in the article has an image in which you can barely make out "21 30.153' N" and "50 28.445 E". This is corroborated by info at http://www.meteoritestudies.com/protected_WABAR.HTM . Converting those values to decimal degrees, I get 21.5028 N x 50.4742 E : http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=21.5028,50.4742&spn=0.1,0.1&q=21.5028,50.4742 I was unable to discern anything in there. I don't know what to put into that URL to make it go to the satellite view automatically. But this should go into the article. - Chris C, 18-Feb-2007

Notes[edit]

It is interesting to compare Philby's plan of the area (H. St John Philby, 1933, "Rub' al Khali: An Account of Exploration in the Great Desert of Arabia under the auspices and patronage of His Majesty 'Abdul 'Aziz ibn Sa'ud, King of the Hejaz and Nejd and its Dependencies" The Geographical Journal Vol 81 no 1, January 1933, pages 1-26 - plan is opp page 10) and that produced by Wynn and Shoemaker (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/jwynn/3wabar.html). Philby mentions the two large craters (100 and 50 yards diameter) and 'three similar craters close by', but on his plan only shows two 'exposed craters' (ie the larger two) and two 'submerged craters?' plus the 'Reputed site of large iron block'. The block site on the plan might be the fifth crater to which he refers in the text. Wynn's eleven meter crater is not shown on Philby's plan.81.159.88.183 (talk) 13:52, 26 October 2009 (UTC)

There was an hour-long tv documentary programme shown on UK tv about the Wynn expedition, but I can't find an online reference to it.81.159.88.183 (talk) 13:54, 26 October 2009 (UTC)

Location of Stone?[edit]

So where did the rock Aramco recovered end up? Paul, in Saudi (talk) 08:14, 5 July 2011 (UTC)