Talk:Wagon Wheel (song)

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Secor quote[edit]

(removed from article)

"I find that the number of singers in the chorus makes it all the more exciting. That's what folk music is and this is a folk song. I think the thing that's interesting about 'Wagon Wheel' is that a folk song could be really popular in 2013. Every strike is against it. All the odds are against folk music, particularly one song rising up and having an impact."[1]

Ketch Secor

--Artaxerxes (talk) 18:55, 12 October 2013 (UTC)

Unbalanced treatment of Rucker version[edit]

I think the current version places too much emphasis on a cover version. I would like some other opinions before I undo another person's work, but the various subsections and quotes are not encyclopedic. It reads like an interview/ article with Rucker. Also, there is a more detail on the OCMS version on their page than on this particular article. That seems odd as well. 24.210.190.173 (talk) 18:57, 9 September 2013 (UTC)

Samples[edit]

Might be helpful to have audio samples of . .

  1. Big Bill Broonzy's recording that led to
  2. Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup's
  3. Dylan's “Rock me, mama” outtake
  4. OCMS version
  5. Rucker version

The OCMS page section on the song also adds some depth to the background.--Artaxerxes (talk) 18:34, 8 April 2013 (UTC)

Notability[edit]

is this page necessary....at all...for any reason?--Tainter 01:44, 31 August 2006 (UTC)

I don't see so. Delete, yes? Mang 06:32, 6 September 2006 (UTC)

This page is notable in my opinion but im too lazy to find sources or anything at the moment - but go look at how many people have covered it on youtube. dozens. SECProto 23:15, 16 January 2007 (UTC)

I agree, while it may have been better for someone to start by writing an article for O.C.M.S. (album), I think this is their most popular song and it has an interesting history with the Dylan co-write. The article could use better sources. CMT describes this as the band's signature song [1] which is one of the proposed criteria in WP:MUSIC/SONG, and they rank the album as one of the top 10 bluegrass albums of 2004. Americana-UK ranks the album as number 18 in their 2004 year-end survey. -MrFizyx 21:18, 17 January 2007 (UTC)

I can't see how this is marked as a stub - at the moment, it's a great article with everything I need to know about the song - answered all of my questions! NickGlasowiski 03:25, 26 February 2007 (UTC)

DEFINITELY a keeper! I was in Mountain View Arkansas and a group was playing this piece. I remember thinking the group looked like they were from the 60's. The harmony was incredible, and the guitar, banjo, harmonica and fiddle were great. I actually thought "Bob Dylan" when I heard it. I wrote down the few words I could remember when I returned to my vehicle and couldn't wait to get home and Google the lyrics and find the song. I was amazed to find the chorus was written by Dylan for Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid. I just sat through the entire movie and was disappointed when I didn't hear Dylan sing the chorus. This article explained why. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Pactum314 (talkcontribs) 02:03, 15 March 2008 (UTC)

Saving Jane did not record this song. Pat Buzzard, member of Saving Jane did. I think that needs to be set straight. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Tkohio (talkcontribs) 03:10, 11 November 2008 (UTC)

This page reads like Darius Rucker's PR company wrote it. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.27.35.79 (talk) 08:00, 29 May 2013 (UTC)

On the song's popularity/impact from freetimes April 23, 2014:

Penned by Old Crow Medicine Show frontman Ketch Secor in the late ’90s and borrowing its chorus from an unreleased song fragment by Bob Dylan, “Wagon Wheel” solidly predates O Brother Where Art Thou?, another Coen Brothers movie that helped kickstart folk music’s renewed popularity back in 2001. At some point in the last 10 years, though, it emerged as the unlikely anthem for restless legions eager to unleash the banjo — and all of its rustic associations — as a building block in modern popular music. You can hear it at frat parties, weddings, baseball games and barrooms across America, its saturation approaching the ubiquity of standards like “Free Bird” and “The Weight.”[2]

--Artaxerxes (talk) 16:25, 23 April 2014 (UTC)

Lists of covers[edit]

Someone wants to include a fairly random list of bands covering this song, including bands not even rating Wikipedia articles. This is a song every bar band is doing these days; I propose limiting such a list to those bands with significant covers (chart ratings, perhaps, or reviews, or anything other than bare claims that so-and-so did this song.) (I'm glad I get paid when my band does it...but we're not listed here either.) --jpgordon::==( o ) 20:19, 4 June 2012 (UTC)

I don't see an 'Other versions' section. One just pulled from lede: "The song was also remixed by the electronic duo Timeflies as a part of their Timeflies Tuesday series on Youtube." --Artaxerxes (talk) 15:16, 8 June 2013 (UTC)

Origin[edit]

"originally sketched" is incorrect, I think. It is generally said (by which I mean, I've read more than one person saying this) that Bob Dylan credited Arthur Crudup for "Rock Me, Mama". Crudup, in turn, is alleged to have said that he based his song on Big Bill Broonzy's "Rock Me Baby". Broonzy, in turn, got the chorus from somewhere else, before such songs were recorded. The anonymous origin of this chorus makes this folk music in the purest sense.

Here's an article giving this origin story: [3] CraigMiloRogers (talk) 04:29, 20 June 2013 (UTC)

The Old Crow section on the song [[2]] tries to lay this out. Also see Samples section above. --Artaxerxes (talk) 17:54, 20 June 2013 (UTC)